Neo-Nazis are using the Army as a training camp

Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP file photo

White supremacists aren't the type of people you want to train to be unstoppable fighting machines, but that doesn't mean they're not signing up for the call of duty. In a disturbing Reuters investigation, Daniel Trotta uncovers the campaign by neo-Nazis and certain skinhead groups to encourage enlistment in the Army and Marine Corps so members can learn the skills to overthrow the government, or in neo-Nazi speak, the Zionist Occupation Government. "They call it 'rahowa' - short for racial holy war - and they are preparing for it by joining the ranks of ... the U.S. military," writes Trotta. "Get in, get trained and get out to brace for the coming race war." 

The recruiting practice is gaining scrutiny in light of the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting by gunman Wade Michael Page, a former U.S. Army soldier and neo-Nazi musician. As CNN reported  last week, Page's base, Fort Bragg, "was home to a small number of white supremacists including three soldiers later convicted in the murder of an African-American couple." Reuters caught up with Marine T.J. Leydon, who served from 1988 to 1991 while openly promoting neo-Nazi causes:

"I went into the Marine Corps for one specific reason: I would learn how shoot," Leyden told Reuters. "I also learned how to use C-4 (explosives), blow things up. I took all my military skills and said I could use these to train other people," said Leyden, 46, who has since renounced the white power movement and is a consultant for the anti-Nazi Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Read more at The Atlantic Wire.

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