AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Charles S. Clark

Senior Correspondent Charles S. Clark joined Government Executive in the fall of 2009. He has been on staff at The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, National Journal, Time-Life Books, Tax Analysts, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the National Center on Education and the Economy. He has written or edited online news, daily news stories, long features, wire copy, magazines, books, and organizational media strategies.
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Agency Buyers Express Rising Optimism About Workforce Skills, Communication

July 18, 2018 Contracting officers around government are feeling more upbeat about their colleagues’ skill levels and ability to execute complicated information technology purchases, according to a survey unveiled on Wednesday. Despite perennial worries about budgets, regulatory restraints and obstacles to hiring, most of the 65 acquisition professionals interviewed are optimistic, according to...

E-Mail Preservation Bill Clears House

July 18, 2018 Four years after it was first introduced, a bill to require agencies and the White House to modernize their systems for preserving email records cleared the House on Monday by voice vote. Managed by on the floor by Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., the Electronic Message Preservation Act (H.R. 1376) was...

Treasury and IRS Move to Protect Donor Anonymity

July 17, 2018 Five years after the alleged “targeting” of conservative nonprofits by the Internal Revenue Service, the Treasury Department and the tax agency on Monday released a new rule that relieves tax-exempt groups from having to reveal the personal identity information of their donors. The move by the Trump administration furthers a...

Special Counsel Employees Say They’re Reluctant to File Internal Complaints

July 17, 2018 The Office of Special Counsel, while coping with an expanding backlog of complaints about prohibited personnel practices, needs to better communicate expected timelines to sometimes-frustrated whistleblowers, a congressional watchdog recommended. The agency’s long-criticized system for handling complaints from its own employees could use a more neutral internal channel, the Government...

Could New Software Speed Up FOIA Responses?

July 17, 2018 Attorneys have long been using what are called e-Discovery tools to organize documents gathered as evidence. But now, according to one San Francisco-based software marketer, federal agencies could exploit such electronic tools to accelerate their responses to Freedom of Information Act requests. Backlogs in federal FOIA offices have been common...

FBI Internal Survey Shows Morale Was Higher Before Comey was Fired

July 16, 2018 A newly disclosed internal poll of FBI employees reveals a sharp decline in confidence in the bureau’s senior leadership under Director Christopher Wray, according to analysis by Lawfare, a legal blogging outlet that obtained the survey results under the Freedom of Information Act. “Across an array of metrics, both at...

Pentagon Watchdog to Examine Sexual Harassment at Defense Schools

July 16, 2018 The Pentagon inspector general will open a review of procedures and policies designed to prevent sexual harassment of students in the Defense Department’s pre-K-12 school system, Principal Deputy IG Glenn Fine announced on Thursday. In a memo to all service secretaries and manpower-related Defense undersecretaries, the IG previewed an “evaluation...

FEMA Acknowledges Flaws in Puerto Rico Post-Hurricane Effort

July 13, 2018 In stark contrast to President Trump’s upbeat tweet last September claiming a “great job” and “massive food and water delivered,” the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Thursday acknowledged that it could have been better prepared for the surprisingly vast needs following Hurricane Maria’s destruction of much of Puerto Rico last...

Former HHS Secretary Price Violated Travel Rules in 20 of 21 Trips

July 13, 2018 Ten months after the forced resignation of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, an audit of his controversial overuse of charter and military aircraft found that his team failed to comply with travel regulations in 20 of 21 trips reviewed—at a cost to the government of $341,000. “Examples of...

Inspectors General Mark 40th Year Feeling Needed But Stretched

July 12, 2018 Sen. Chuck Grassley called them “a force multiplier.” Former Attorney General William Barr said they have “the hardest job in any organization.” And Special Counsel Henry Kerner said that without a connection to them, his agency would be a “leaf in the wind.” All spoke on Wednesday to an assembly...