Civil Rights

After a Year of Investigation, the Border Patrol Has Little to Say About Agents’ Misogynistic and Racist Facebook Group

The Border Patrol vowed a full accounting after ProPublica revealed hateful posts in the private Facebook group. Now congressional investigators say the agency is blocking them and revealing little about its internal investigation.

National Guard Commander To Testify ‘Excessive Force’ Used on White House Protesters

Officer on the scene saw spent tear gas canisters, contradicting key details of Attorney General Barr’s account of the controversial night.

Analysis: 4 Lawsuits that Challenge Trump’s Federal Agents in Portland Test Issues Other Cities Will Likely Face

The lawsuits filed in Portland sparked by the presence of federal law enforcement agents sent there by President Trump are a preview of the legal battles to come in cities across the U.S.

When Feeling American Requires Leaving America

For some Black U.S. diplomats, the moment they feel most American is when they are abroad.

DHS’ Portland Stunt Could Undermine the Agency For Years, Former Officials Warn

"This is well outside the bounds of what the intent is of the federal protective services' mission," one says.

GovExec Daily: Navigating the Hatch Act During the Current Era

Courtney Bublé joins the podcast to examine how feds can navigate the current era and when they support issues-based causes.

Ban by Omission: US Military Leaves Confederate Flag Off Approved List

Esper’s order seems designed to bar the flag from display without provoking the president.

Survey: 80% of Older Adults Have Faced Ageism

Many older adults in a new survey report experiencing some kind of ageism, though it hasn't dimmed their view of getting older.

How a Key Federal Civil Rights Agency Was Sidelined as Historic Protests Erupted

Launched by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964, the Community Relations Service has been without a director and short-staffed during recent unrest. The Trump administration has repeatedly tried to eliminate the agency.

Supreme Court Upholds American Indian Treaty Promises, Orders Oklahoma To Follow Federal Law

Land in what is now eastern Oklahoma, which was granted to the Creek Nation by Congress in 1833, is still under tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court ruled.

Top U.S. General Slams Confederacy As ‘Treason’, Signals Support For Base Renaming

“Those generals fought for the institution of slavery,” Gen. Mark Milley told a House hearing.

Analysis: Why Soldiers Can’t Claim Conscientious Objection if Ordered to Suppress Protests

The U.S. military can exempt from service those who are religiously or morally opposed to violence. But conscientious objector status won't help soldiers who disagree with specific lawful orders.

Lawmakers, Legal Experts Decry Federal Crackdown on Protesters as Unlawful

House committee holds hearing on controversial federal law enforcement tactics prior to Trump's church photo op.

The First U.S. General to Call Trump a Bigot

Ricardo Sanchez, the retired former commander of U.S. ground forces in Iraq, becomes the first high-ranking military officer to call out the president for racism.

GovExec Daily: Civilian Federal Buildings Named After Segregationists

Eric Katz joins the show to discuss the potential renaming of facilities such as the Thomas G. Abernathy Federal Building and the Strom Thurmond Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse.

Civilian Federal Buildings Are Named After Confederates, KKK Members and Segregationists, Too

Amid uproar over military bases, GSA also operates buildings named after individuals with racist pasts.