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Robinson Meyer

Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology.
Results 1-10 of 192

Flying Cars Are Real—And They’re Not Bad for the Climate

May 18, 2019 FROM NEXTGOV arrow It has a sleek black pill of a body, with two rigid, white arms sprouting from its sides. It looks, in other words, like an iPad had a baby with a crop duster, or like a Volkswagen Bug from a future designed by Bjork. In the video, it sits on...

The Next ‘South China Sea’ Is Covered in Ice

May 15, 2019 In a perfect world, the Arctic Council would meet around a massive spruce table in a castle of ice. It would include Erik the Red, Superman, several Inuit elders, Justin Trudeau, and Magnus Byrnison, King of the Polar Bears, and they would discuss villainous threats to the North. In fact...

A Very Important Climate Fact That No One Knows

May 9, 2019 Does the country’s most popular climate policy actually work? A controversial new study suggests that a type of state policy—usually called a “renewable portfolio standard,” or RPS—may impose large hidden costs on Americans. But a wide range of experts, including engineers, political theorists, and economists, aren’t sure the paper can...

Greenland Is Falling Apart

April 23, 2019 The Greenland Ice Sheet is the world’s second-largest reservoir of fresh water sitting on the world’s largest island. It is almost mind-bogglingly huge. If Greenland were suddenly transported to the central United States, it would be a very bad day for about 65 million people, who would be crushed instantly....

What Spy-Satellite Companies Can Teach NASA About Climate Change

April 14, 2019 FROM NEXTGOV arrow SAN FRANCISCO—The sky has filled with eyes, and NASA is starting to notice. Over the last several years, venture-funded start-ups have hurled hundreds of inexpensive satellites into orbit. For-profit companies have used smartphone technology to make compact satellites that look down at Earth and monitor its every oceanic gurgle, erupting...

What Spy-Satellite Companies Can Teach NASA About Climate Change

April 11, 2019 SAN FRANCISCO—The sky has filled with eyes, and NASA is starting to notice. Over the last several years, venture-funded start-ups have hurled hundreds of inexpensive satellites into orbit. For-profit companies have used smartphone technology to make compact satellites that look down at Earth and monitor its every oceanic gurgle, erupting...

America Cares About Climate Change Again

March 19, 2019 Suddenly, climate change is a high-profile national issue again. It’s not just the Green New Deal. Around the country, the loose alliance of politicians, activists, and organizations concerned about climate change is mobilizing. They are deploying a new set of strategies aimed at changing the minds—or at least the behaviors—of...

There Really, Really Isn’t a Silver Bullet for Climate Change

March 6, 2019 When the fate of the planet is at stake, a single precedent starts to seem like a blueprint. Most Americans, as far as pollsters can tell, want the United States to honor its commitment under the Paris Agreement on climate change. According to that pact, the United States must, by...

Why Americans Might Never Notice Climate Change’s Hotter Weather

March 3, 2019 In the past 50 years, climate change has altered the weather of the United States, leading to milder winters, warmer nights, and sweltering summer heat waves. These changes will intensify in the decades to come; by the end of the century, for instance, Philadelphia could feel a lot like Memphis....

The East Coast Is Going to Get Arkansas-ified

February 13, 2019 Sixty years from now, climate change could transform the East Coast into the Gulf Coast. It will move Minnesota to Kansas, turn Tulsa into Texas, and hoist Houston into Mexico. Even Oregonians might ooze out of their damp, chilly corner and find themselves carried to the central valley of California....