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Robinson Meyer

Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology.
Results 1-10 of 186

America Cares About Climate Change Again

March 19, 2019 Suddenly, climate change is a high-profile national issue again. It’s not just the Green New Deal. Around the country, the loose alliance of politicians, activists, and organizations concerned about climate change is mobilizing. They are deploying a new set of strategies aimed at changing the minds—or at least the behaviors—of...

There Really, Really Isn’t a Silver Bullet for Climate Change

March 6, 2019 When the fate of the planet is at stake, a single precedent starts to seem like a blueprint. Most Americans, as far as pollsters can tell, want the United States to honor its commitment under the Paris Agreement on climate change. According to that pact, the United States must, by...

Why Americans Might Never Notice Climate Change’s Hotter Weather

March 3, 2019 In the past 50 years, climate change has altered the weather of the United States, leading to milder winters, warmer nights, and sweltering summer heat waves. These changes will intensify in the decades to come; by the end of the century, for instance, Philadelphia could feel a lot like Memphis....

The East Coast Is Going to Get Arkansas-ified

February 13, 2019 Sixty years from now, climate change could transform the East Coast into the Gulf Coast. It will move Minnesota to Kansas, turn Tulsa into Texas, and hoist Houston into Mexico. Even Oregonians might ooze out of their damp, chilly corner and find themselves carried to the central valley of California....

The Unprecedented Surge in Fear About Climate Change

January 23, 2019 A surging number of Americans understand that climate change is happening and believe that it could harm their family and the country, according to a new poll from Yale and George Mason University. But at the same time, Americans are not any more willing to pay money to fight climate...

Are We Living Through Climate Change’s Worst-Case Scenario?

January 15, 2019 The year 2018 was not an easy one for planet Earth. Sure, wind and solar energy kept getting cheaper, and an electric car became America’s best-selling luxury vehicle. But the most important metric of climatic health—the amount of heat-trapping gas entering the atmosphere—got suddenly and shockingly worse. In the United...

A Terrifying Sea-Level Prediction Now Looks Far Less Likely

January 6, 2019 One of the scariest scenarios for near-term, disastrous sea-level rise may be off the table for now, according to a new study previewed at a recent scientific conference. Two years ago, the glaciologists Robert DeConto and David Pollard rocked their field with a paper arguing that several massive glaciers in...

Democrats Establish a New House ‘Climate Crisis’ Committee

January 1, 2019 It’s official: When Democrats take control of the House of Representatives next month, they will form a special new committee to examine climate change, Nancy Pelosi said in a statement last week. Pelosi, likely the next speaker of the House, also announced that the new committee will be named the...

The Southwest May Be Deep Into a Climate-Changed Mega-Drought

December 18, 2018 Every so often, the American West seems to lurch into something called a “mega-drought.” The rains falter, the rivers wither, and the forests become tinder boxes waiting for a spark. Mega-droughts are notoriously hard to study—the last one happened in the 16th century—but what we do know is worrisome. In...

An Upheaval at the Ends of the World

December 12, 2018 It was not so long ago—only 108 years, within a great-grandma’s memory—that a person’s eyes first beheld the South Pole. When Roald Amundsen made it to the bottom of the world in 1911, it marked a new chapter in the human story. Our curious, inventive, and adaptable species, born on...