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Marina Koren

Marina Koren Marina Koren is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic. She was previously the news editor at National Journal.
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NASA Chief: 'I Fully Believe and Know the Climate Is Changing'

May 18, 2018 The new administrator of NASA held a town hall Thursday at the agency’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. Jim Bridenstine is about four weeks into the job, and his path here was mired in controversy. After a few opening remarks, he started taking some questions. The first was about what Bridenstine...

The Mystery of the ‘SpaceBees’ Just Got Even Weirder

May 17, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow “Perfect timing!” Mike Coletta said when he answered the phone. I called him recently to ask about some satellites currently orbiting Earth. Just then, one of them was passing over his home in Colorado. Coletta has been tracking satellites with radio antennas mounted on his house for years. This spring,...

Helicopters Are Coming to a Planet Near You

May 15, 2018 The first space missions humans sent to Mars were flybys. Spacecraft had one chance to observe the planet before hurtling away, never to return. Then came the orbiters, designed to be captured by Mars’s gravity and stick around. Eventually, the orbiters started bringing landers with them, dropping them on the...

The Solar System's Icy Secret Keeper

May 14, 2018 In 2003, a NASA spacecraft plunged into the swirling atmosphere of Jupiter and vaporized. Galileo, named for the astronomer who discovered the planet’s biggest moons, had spent more nearly eight years in orbit, collecting data about the Jovian environment and relaying it back to Earth. “We learned mind-boggling things,” said...

Congress Is Quietly Nudging NASA to Look for Aliens

May 10, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In October 1992, astronomers kicked off an ambitious project years in the making. Two radio telescopes, one in Puerto Rico and the other in California, started scouring the night sky for potential signals from alien civilizations somewhere deep in the cosmos. “We begin the search,” declared Jill Tarter, the project...

Are We There Yet?

May 4, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In 2012, it took the Curiosity rover seven minutes to descend from the top of the Martian atmosphere down to the surface, slowing from a speed of 13,000 miles per hour to zero. It took double that for signals from the spacecraft to reach Earth. NASA scientists and engineers held...

NASA Finally Gets a New Leader

April 21, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow After an unprecedented wait, the nation’s space agency has a Trump-picked, Senate-approved, permanent leader at last. Lawmakers voted 50–49 on Thursday to approve the nomination of Jim Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, for nasa administrator, following months of debate over his qualifications and growing uncertainty over leadership at the...

What Happens When a Space Station Falls Out of the Sky

April 3, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Sometime this weekend, an abandoned Chinese space station the size of a school bus will plummet back to Earth and mostly disintegrate in the atmosphere. Whatever chunks survive the intense heat of the journey will probably land in the ocean or a remote part of land, away from populated areas....

Why Is NASA's Space Telescope Running a Year Behind?

March 28, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For the world’s most powerful space telescope, the finish line keeps getting further and further away. The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the famed Hubble, has been pushed back about a year, from spring 2019 to May 2020, NASA officials said Tuesday. The delay is...

Why Is NASA's Space Telescope Running a Year Behind?

March 28, 2018 For the world’s most powerful space telescope, the finish line keeps getting further and further away. The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the famed Hubble, has been pushed back about a year, from spring 2019 to May 2020, NASA officials said Tuesday. The delay is...