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Marcus Weisgerber

Global Business Editor Marcus Weisgerber is the global business editor for Defense One, where he writes about the intersection of business and national security. He has been covering defense and national security issues for more than a decade, previously as Pentagon correspondent for Defense News and chief editor of Inside the Air Force. He has reported from Afghanistan, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia, and often travels with the defense secretary and other senior military officials.
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Military Revises Count, Says 500 Americans Likely Killed in Iraq By ‘Iranian Activities’

September 11, 2015 The U.S. military has revised its accounting of the number of American troop deaths during the Iraq War it blames on Iran, complicating what had become a talking point for critics of President Barack Obama’s nuclear deal with the regime in Tehran. U.S. officials revealed on Tuesday that 196 American...

Do Qatar, UAE Airlines Threaten US National Security?

September 9, 2015 The big three U.S. airlines — American, Delta and United — have long claimed that massive subsidies from the UAE and Qatari governments unfairly prop up Emirates, Etihad Airways, and Qatar Airways. Now they’re saying it’s bad for U.S. national security as well. They make their claim in a new...

How Many US Troops Were Killed By Iranian IEDs in Iraq?

September 8, 2015 Explosively formed penetrators — a particularly deadly form of roadside bomb — killed 196 American soldiers in Iraq over a five-and-a-half-year period, according to recently declassified Pentagon documents. That’s about half as many deaths as lawmakers have attributed to the bombs, which U.S. officials say were largely supplied by Iran’s...

UK to Decide Whether To Allow Women in Combat Jobs Next Year

September 4, 2015 Great Britain, America’s closest ally, could recommend allowing women to serve in certain infantry and armor combat roles as soon as early 2016, a top U.K. official said. The decision will in any case be made next year, Penny Mordaunt, the British minister of state for the armed forces, said...

Ukraine Aims To Rebuild Navy

September 2, 2015 The much-diminished Ukrainian Navy wants new warships, but getting them will be difficult. Ukraine lost about two-thirds of its fleet when Russia annexed Crimea in early 2014; the Black Sea peninsula was home to most of Kiev’s warships and its naval headquarters at Sevastopol. The Ukrainian Navy now has about...

Now NATO’s Prepping for Hybrid War

August 27, 2015 NATO is preparing to hold its most complex military drills in decades — perhaps since the Cold War — as it readies allied troops for a range of hybrid combat scenarios that they might face in coming years. Tens of thousands of troops, hundreds of aircraft, ships and submarines are...

Oshkosh Wins Massive Army Contract to Replace Humvee

August 26, 2015 Oshkosh won the Pentagon’s $30 billion sweepstakes to replace the U.S. Army’s Humvee with up to 55,000 new Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, or JLTVs, over the next 25 years, service officials said. The Army awarded a $6.7 billion contract Tuesday to Oshkosh for an initial batch of 17,000 vehicles for...

Oshkosh Wins $30 Billion Army Contract Battle to Replace Humvee

August 25, 2015 Oshkosh won the Pentagon’s $30 billion sweepstakes to replace the U.S. Army’s Humvee with up to 55,000 new Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, or JLTVs, over the next 25 years, service officials said. The Army awarded a $6.7 billion contract Tuesday to Oshkosh for an initial batch of 17,000 vehicles for...

Can One Single Service Control All Military Drones?

August 25, 2015 A decade ago, as the U.S. military scrambled to gear up for unexpectedly lengthy wars, the Air Force declared that it should oversee all Pentagon drones that flew higher than 3,500 feet. Its argument was simple: these new weapons were being developed and purchased in tremendous quantity and significant diversity....

Should One US Service Rule the Military’s Drones?

August 24, 2015 A decade ago, as the U.S. military scrambled to gear up for unexpectedly lengthy wars, the Air Force declared that it should oversee all Pentagon drones that flew higher than 3,500 feet. Its argument was simple: these new weapons were being developed and purchased in tremendous quantity and significant diversity....