Author Archive

Norm Ornstein

Norm Ornstein

Norm Ornstein is a correspondent for The Atlantic, a contributing editor and columnist for National Journal, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research.
Norm Ornstein is a correspondent for The Atlantic, a contributing editor and columnist for National Journal, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research.
Management

Analysis: The Real Cause of the Last Government Shutdown—and the Next One

Republican leaders have proven unable to enact any spending bills, despite controlling both houses of Congress.

Management

Rewriting the Rules of Presidential Succession

A project begun after 9/11 assumes new urgency after the 2016 election—creating a more sensible plan for what happens when a chief executive steps aside.

Management

The Show Trial of IRS Commissioner John Koskinen

The congressional resolution condemning the longtime public servant breaks with both precedent and decency.

Oversight

Is This the Worst Congress Ever?

It can’t pass a budget, can’t confirm appointments, and now it can’t even scrounge up funding to address public-health crises.

Oversight

Why Bernie Sanders Can't Govern

Hillary Clinton’s realistic attitude is the only thing that can effect change in today’s political climate.

Management

Slashing IRS Budget Carries a Heavy Price

Cutting the agency's funding will result in a serious drop in revenue due to fewer audits and less oversight—which will worsen our federal budget deficits.

Oversight

Trust Is Not Enough to Break Through Washington Gridlock

Reality check: The bigger problems aren't because individuals don't get along; they're because of larger factors in the political culture.

FEATURED EBOOKS
Oversight

Congress Returns to Doing Nothing

One major piece of unfinished business: a spending measure to keep government open after Sept. 30.

Oversight

New Firing Process Could Make Things Worse at VA

Some of the reforms Congress is weighing could give more power to miscreants over their inferiors.

Oversight

Republicans Would be Better Off Dropping the Idea That All Government Is Bad

It's not just Eric Cantor. Reformist conservatives have good ideas, but until they drop the idea that all government is bad, they'll never be realistic.

Oversight

Why We Can't Stop Talking About Filibusters

The refusal of Senate Republicans to compromise has backfired on them big time.

Oversight

Analysis: Want Effective Government? Then You Have to Pay Better

Civil servants face a brain drain if Congress persists with pay freezes, benefit cuts, and badmouthing dedicated employees.

Oversight

What If Republicans Capture the Senate?

A winning midterm would encourage the GOP's worst impulses toward obstruction, hearten the 2016 presidential field, and bottle up Obama nominees.

Oversight

Why It's So Hard for Obama to Be Tough on Russia

The president needs Putin as his ally to accomplish his most ambitious second-term goals.

FEATURED EBOOKS
Oversight

Analysis: Henry Waxman: A Relic of the Era When Congress Used to Work

With the possible exceptions of Ted Kennedy and John Dingell, no one in the past 50 years or more has had a broader impact on American society than the retiring California representative.

Oversight

Analysis: Budget Deal May Not Herald the End of Congressional Dysfunction

There are paths to more functionality in 2014, but they are long, winding, pothole-filled, and have limited access.

Oversight

Analysis: Time to Stop the Senate Filibuster Madness

Blocking qualified D.C. Circuit Court nominees is all about denying a president the right to pick judges to fill vacancies.

Management

The White House's Original Sin: A Failure of Effective Management

The Healthcare.gov debacle shows the administration doesn't know how to run the executive branch.

Oversight

Analysis: The Sequester Is a Disaster, and Congress's Next Move May Be Worse

From national parks to medical research, cuts are undermining what makes America great. Yet Republicans seem set on shutting down the government or even default.

Defense

Analysis: The U.S. Government Still Isn't Ready for a Catastrophic Terror Attack

If a major attack incapacitated the president, Congress, or Supreme Court, the nation would have no way to replace them -- despite 12 years of warnings.