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Katherine McIntire Peters

Deputy Editor Katherine is deputy editor of Government Executive Media Group, a division of Atlantic Media, where she oversees editorial coverage for GovExec.com. She previously was executive editor of Nextgov.
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Shake Up at Homeland Security as Border Crisis Mounts

April 8, 2019 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Just days after traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border to deal with a surge in migrants crossing from Latin America, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is stepping down. President Trump announced Nielsen’s abrupt resignation in a tweet Sunday evening. “I am pleased to announce that Kevin McAleenan, the current U.S. Customs...

Shakeup at Homeland Security as Border Pressures Mount

April 8, 2019 Just days after traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border to deal with a surge in migrants crossing from Latin America, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is stepping down. President Trump announced Nielsen’s abrupt resignation in a tweet Sunday evening. “I am pleased to announce that Kevin McAleenan, the current U.S. Customs...

Shake Up at Homeland Security as Border Crisis Mounts

April 7, 2019 Just days after traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border to deal with a surge in migrants crossing from Latin America, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is stepping down. President Trump announced Nielsen’s abrupt resignation in a tweet Sunday evening. “I am pleased to announce that Kevin McAleenan, the current U.S. Customs...

The Retroactive Pay Raise Is in 'Final Clearance' Stage, says White House Official

March 20, 2019 About that retroactive pay raise federal employees received last month: The check’s not in the mail yet, but it really is coming, a senior White House official said Wednesday. “We’re in the final-week-of-clearance stage,” said Margaret Weichert, acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, on Wednesday. “I know that...

Government's Grand Challenges

February 27, 2019 In 1970, just a year after Government Executive began covering the business of government, Alvin Toffler published Future Shock, a huge international bestseller about the disruptive effects of rapidly evolving technologies on individuals and society. It was a year of tremendous upheaval: The Vietnam War raged; National Guard troops killed...

FEMA Administrator Brock Long Resigns

February 13, 2019 As House Oversight and Reform Committee lawmakers gear up for investigations into the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s response to catastrophic hurricanes in 2017, FEMA Administrator Brock Long on Wednesday announced his departure: “While this has been the opportunity of a lifetime, it is time for me to go home to...

Trump on a Feb. 15 Shutdown: 'We've Set the Stage for What Is Going to Happen'

January 31, 2019 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Less than a week after President Trump ended the longest-ever government shutdown, he suggested he is willing to force another partial government shutdown on Feb. 15 if lawmakers don’t provide funding for a wall along the Southwest border. Or perhaps he will declare a national emergency. What he's not willing...

Trump on a Feb. 15 Shutdown: 'We've Set the Stage for What Is Going to Happen'

January 31, 2019 Less than a week after President Trump ended the longest-ever government shutdown, he suggested he is willing to force another partial government shutdown on Feb. 15 if lawmakers don’t provide funding for a wall along the Southwest border. Or perhaps he will declare a national emergency. What he's not willing...

Days Into the Shutdown, the Costs Are Mounting

December 28, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Government shutdowns are expensive. For government workers, the costs are personal—the mortgage payments, school tuition and utility bills will keep coming, even if paychecks are disrupted. Feds may eventually be compensated for lost wages (Congress has authorized retroactive pay for furloughed workers during past shutdowns), but if the shutdown drags...

Days Into the Shutdown, the Costs Are Mounting

December 28, 2018 Government shutdowns are expensive. For government workers, the costs are personal—the mortgage payments, school tuition and utility bills will keep coming, even if paychecks are disrupted. Feds may eventually be compensated for lost wages (Congress has authorized retroactive pay for furloughed workers during past shutdowns), but if the shutdown drags...