AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Charles S. Clark

Senior Correspondent Charles S. Clark joined Government Executive in the fall of 2009. He has been on staff at The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, National Journal, Time-Life Books, Tax Analysts, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the National Center on Education and the Economy. He has written or edited online news, daily news stories, long features, wire copy, magazines, books, and organizational media strategies.
Results 51-60 of 3611

GSA Isn't Tracking All of the Federal Government's Unused Leased Office Space

August 13, 2018 About 1 percent of federally owned buildings are vacant, according to the Public Buildings Service, but that figure omits 785,400 square feet of unused leased space worth $21 million a year in uncollected revenue, a watchdog found. The inspector general for the General Services Administration, reviewing the government’s lease inventory...

Why NSA Has Its Eye on ‘Girls Who Code’

August 11, 2018 The highly secretive National Security Agency is taking advantage of a flood of employment applications to ensure a diverse workforce equipped for future innovation. So declared Army Gen. Paul Nakasone, who was sworn in this May as the three-hatted lead of NSA, U.S. Cyber Command and the lesser-known 25,000-employee Central...

NSA Director: The Agency 'Sells Itself' to Potential Recruits

August 10, 2018 The highly secretive National Security Agency is taking advantage of a flood of employment applications to ensure a diverse workforce equipped for future innovation. So declared Army Gen. Paul Nakasone, who was sworn in this May as the three-hatted lead of NSA, U.S. Cyber Command and the lesser-known 25,000-employee Central...

IRS Employee Admits to Criminal Identity Theft

August 10, 2018 At a time when curbing identity theft is high on the Internal Revenue Service’s agenda, an Atlanta-based IRS employee has pleaded guilty to a stolen identity fraud scheme. The Justice Department announced on Thursday that IRS contact representative Stephanie Parker, based in Atlanta, admitted to at least five instances between...

Defense Agencies Continue Awarding Contracts to Suspended Firms, Report Finds

August 9, 2018 At least nine major contractors, working primarily for defense-related agencies, have benefited from waivers under a 1981 law that allows federal officials to override the firms’ suspensions for such misconduct as fraud, bribery and theft. That’s according to a new study of 22 contract decisions released this week by Bloomberg...

Poll: Americans Still Want a President Who's a Good Manager

August 9, 2018 The ability to manage the vast federal government is the factor Americans rated as most important among three leadership traits in judging presidents, according to a Gallup Poll released on Thursday. The 37 percent who rated that as the top trait to look for in a president, however, represented a...

GSA Watchdog Raises Questions on Canceled FBI Headquarters Move

August 8, 2018 The latest wrinkle in the on-again-off-again plans for a new FBI headquarters came via a press leak. The inspector general for the General Services Administration, according to a partial draft report provided to The Washington Post, is fine-tuning criticisms suggesting a stronger White House role than GSA officials had previously...

Census Bureau Takes Hits from Lawsuits, GAO Review and Cancelled Contract

August 6, 2018 Just 21 months before the next decennial count, the Census Bureau—under acting leadership—faces challenges in the courts, from auditors and from a mishandled printing contract for key forms. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross continues to confront legal challenges to the reasoning behind the decision to go against agency researchers’ advice and...

Census Bureau Takes Hits from Lawsuits, GAO Review and Cancelled Contract

August 6, 2018 Just 21 months before the next decennial count, the Census Bureau—under acting leadership—faces challenges in the courts, from auditors and from a mishandled printing contract for key forms. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross continues to confront legal challenges to the reasoning behind the decision to go against agency researchers’ advice and...

Small Business Advocate Wins $475K in Legal Fees After 4-Year Fight With Government

August 3, 2018 After four years and expenses of more than $700,000, a California-based small business advocate on Thursday won an agreement from the Justice and Defense departments to pay his legal fees for litigation forcing the government to release confidential contracting data. Lloyd Chapman, the outspoken founder of the Petaluma-based American Small...