Science

How a CDC Program Is Changing Behavior to Reduce Mine Worker Injuries

Thousands of miners are injured each year; scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sought to learn why, and then do something about it.

Lawmakers Call On Commerce Chief to Resign Over Alleged Threats to Fire Top NOAA Officials

Ross is said to have threatened to fire officials if they would not fix a statement contradicting the president’s claims Hurricane Dorian was likely to hit Alabama.

Analysis: NOAA Politicized the Weather Report

The scientific agency sided with the president’s inaccurate forecast over the work of its professional staff.

Why Soviets Sent Dogs to Space While Americans Used Primates

Researchers didn’t know how people would react to weightlessness. So they sent animals first.

When a Hurricane Hits, Neighbors Are the Real First Responders

The best determinant of how well a community fares in a storm is often not what happens after landfall, but what it was like before the wind and water hit.

The Trump Administration Sides With Nurses Who Object to Abortion

HHS says the University of Vermont Medical Center required staffers to violate their conscience. The case underscores Trump’s religious-freedom agenda.

USDA Taps Retired Former Employees to Cope With Mass Exodus at Science Agencies

With the majority of employees at the Economic Research Service and National Institute for Food and Agriculture slated to leave rather than relocate to Kansas City, the department is offering jobs to retired employees—in Washington, D.C.

Viewpoint: Trump Wants to Nuke His Way Out of Big Problems

The president seeks bumper-sticker solutions to complicated problems, from hurricane prevention to border walls.

Better Data Would Ease Gaps In Rural Public Health

Some of the data rural public health officials need to better serve their communities exists but is hard to access and use.

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DEA to Expand the Number of Legal Marijuana Growers

Currently, only one facility can legally grow pot for federally backed research.

USDA Slashes Buyout Payments for Scientific Agency Employees By 60% Ahead of Relocation

Employees of research agencies have less than a week to decide whether to accept $10,000 voluntary separation payments, despite being offered upwards of $25,000 in June.

Decoding the Language of Behavioral Science for Government Officials

Before the techniques can be used to improve program outcomes, it’s helpful if we can agree on what the terminology actually means.

USDA, Union Reach Deal to Ease Relocation Impact on Feds

Employees who agree to move to Kansas City will be given a financial incentive and a transition period of at least three months during which they can continue to work from Washington.

Lawmaker on USDA Office Relocations: 'This Fight is Not Over'

Department officials reaffirmed they will allow employees to change their mind about whether to move to Kansas City until late September, but management has resisted setting that in stone.

USDA Employees Who Didn’t Already Opt to Move to Kansas City May Be Out of Luck

Department officials say July 15 was the hard and fast deadline to accept reassignments, despite previously indicating there was wiggle room until September.

Republicans and Democrats Divided on Approach to Scientific Integrity at Federal Agencies

Democrats hold hearing to advocate for a bill they say would protect federal researchers from inappropriate political influence. 

More than Half of USDA Science Agency Employees May Leave Rather than Relocate

The union representing workers at the Economic Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture has requested a one-year period of full-time telework to ease the transition to Kansas City.