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How information technology is changing the landscape for federal employees.

Telework Keeps People On the Job Longer

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Technology has been touted as a means for retiring federal workers to pass on their knowledge and expertise to tech-savvy new hires. But that may not be the only benefit it is having on knowledge transfer in the federal government. In fact, telework is playing a big factor in many retirement-eligible federal employees deciding to stay in their jobs – giving agencies an even longer window to capture their knowledge and expertise.

Andrew Krzmarzick, director of community engagement for GovLoop, writes in a blog post that telework may be a major driver of Baby Boomers deciding to stay in their jobs beyond their retirement age. He quotes a recent GovLoop interview with Nick Nayak, chief procurement officer at the Homeland Security Department, who noted that while 20-25 percent of DHS’ workforce is at retirement-eligible age or soon to be, DHS workers in 2012 did not retire as quickly as they have in the past.

“Teleworking is a big reason for that,” Nayak told GovLoop. “It allows employees the chance to work a more flexible schedule so they aren’t retiring as early as before.”

Are retirement-eligible Baby Boomers at your agency staying on longer than expected? Is telework contributing at all to this trend?

Maven Madness: Apparently Everyone's An Expert on Social Media

Maven. Ninja. Evangelist. Guru.

The Atlantic reports that these are all popular names that self-proclaimed social media experts are giving themselves, according to an analysis by Ad Age, which counted the most used social media titles on Twitter.

In January 2013, the number of Twitter users with “social media” as part of their bio has grown significantly, to 181,000, up from a mere 16,000 in 2009. “Maven” and “ninja” were nearly tied for being used the most – nearly 22,000 times. Other popular titles were “evangelist” (20,829), “guru” (18,363) and “consultant” (9,031). “At this rate, everyone on Twitter will soon be a social media guru,” Ad Age’s B.L. Ochman writes.

Since Twitter allows only 140 characters plus a url for users to explain even their bio, it’s interesting that so many Twitter users are reserving that limited space to tout social media expertise.

As is shown in a blog post I wrote yesterday on social media at federal agencies, as well as my Twitter feed, I most commonly refer to social media professionals in government as “gurus” or “mavens.” But because these titles are becoming so widespread, perhaps actual social media professionals prefer a title with a more professional tone.

How do you characterize your social media skills in your Twitter bio or on your resume? Do you prefer a more professional title?

Reporter Portrait for GovernmentExecutive.com

Brittany Ballenstedt writes Nextgov's Wired Workplace blog, which delves into the issues facing employees who work in the federal information technology sector. Before joining Nextgov, Brittany covered federal pay and benefits issues as a staff correspondent for Government Executive and served as an associate editor for National Journal's Technology Daily. She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Mansfield University and originally hails from Pennsylvania. She currently lives near Travis Air Force Base, Calif., where her husband is stationed.

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