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Can Bill Clinton's Dream Team Fix the Fiscal-Cliff Negotiations?

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President Clinton, flanked by his economic team, meets reporters in the Rose Garden of the White House Tuesday, May 26, 1998 to discuss the economy. (Doug Mills/AP) President Clinton, flanked by his economic team, meets reporters in the Rose Garden of the White House Tuesday, May 26, 1998 to discuss the economy. (Doug Mills/AP)

A group of economic advisers from the Bill Clinton era thinks it may have stumbled upon a brilliant solution for America's current economic situation: make it more like the Bill Clinton era. Which, given today's Washington gridlock, may not be all that brilliant. Today's new independent proposal for tax reform was put together by the left-leaning Center for American Progress, and it features a host of heavy hitters lending their names to the project. The list of authors includes two former Clinton Chiefs of Staff (William Daley and John Podesta); two of his Treasury secretaries (Robert Rubin and Larry Summers), and a handful of other top Treasury Department appointees from the swinging days of late 1990s surpluses. It's a rock-star lineup, if the last Democratic administration was your favorite band.

The cornerstone of the program, much like the one proposed by Obama, is returning to the top marginal tax rate of the 1990s—39.6 percent. (Matthew Yglesias has a good summary of its key points.) However, they would also raise the threshold for reaching that bracket to more than $400,000, far higher than the president's threshold of $25,000. The rest of the rates would stay the same on regular income taxes, but on many other kinds of taxes, the plan goes much further than the current Democratic wish list. Higher capital gains, no more carried interest deduction, a tougher estate tax, no reductions for health care premiums; and caps on itemized deductions.

But there's even more. While most of those changes would fall heavily on the rich, they also want to bring some of those deduction caps down to the people in lower income brackets and raise taxes on things like cigarettes, alcohol, gambling, and other odds and ends that hit people at all income levels. While Obama's plan calls for $1.2 trillion in new revenue, this one asks for $1.8 trillion... and not just from the richest earners.

Read more at The Atlantic Wire.

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