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Employees Don’t Like Working for Creative Managers

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It’s a commonly held workplace belief that employees who succeed in their current roles should be rewarded with the chance to manage other employees. But big data reveals that what might be prized qualities for an employee are not necessarily traits that drive managerial success.

Managers are the single most important influence on how long an employee stays at her job by a factor of six, which means that effective managers are essential to a healthy and engaged company culture. Attrition and engagement are material concerns for most businesses—employees who are unengaged cost the economy $350 billion yearly, according to a Gallup poll and “corporate directors identified talent management as their single greatest strategic challenge,” according toHarvard Business Review study.

New data from Evolv reveals which leadership characteristics actually drive performance in an organization. The conclusions go against conventional, intuition-based business school wisdom from academics like Peter DruckerMichael Porter and Dale Carnegie, perhaps because these luminaries didn’t have to deal with the challenges of today’s globalized and technical workforce.

Are potentially good managers being overlooked because they don’t exhibit traditionally accepted “good” employee traits? Evolv’s research, conducted in 13 countries, 18 industries and across 500 million data points, debunk two common management myths

Read more at Quartz

(Image via Dooder/Shutterstock.com)

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