Executive Coach Executive CoachExecutive Coach
Scott Eblin offers his take on lessons in the news and his advice on your pressing leadership questions.

More Leadership Lessons from Yoga

ARCHIVES
iofoto/Shutterstock.com

Over the past couple of years, I’ve been in one yoga class or another five or six days a week on average. That might sound like a lot, but it’s pretty much the only form of exercise I do anymore so it’s a good way for me to keep the lights on. As I’ve written here several times, I’ve made a number of connections between what I learn on the yoga mat and leadership development in general. This week, I’ve been thinking about another one. It’s the benefits of staying in the room.

When I’m in Northern Virginia, I go to a place called Down Dog Yoga. The studio is heated to around 96 degrees and humidified to about 50 percent. Needless to say, you sweat a lot in a 90 minute class in those conditions. It’s not exactly comfortable. Invariably, at the beginning of every class, the instructor will ask everyone to stay in the room for the full 90 minutes. She’ll remind you to take a break whenever you need one but to stay in the room as you take it. And, invariably, there will always be people that leave the room anyway.

There are a lot of reasons that aficionados call yoga a practice. One of the biggest is that it can be practice for the rest of your life. Staying in the room is an example of that. Whether it’s a 96 degree yoga classroom, a conference room where you’re hashing it out or a job that just got a lot harder, your life as a leader will regularly present choice points on whether or not you stay in the room.

Here are some of the benefits of staying in the room:

You reset your triggers: Last night, a guy left the room about 15 minutes before class ended. I was talking with the instructor afterward and she said he always leaves the room at that point. He has some sort of mental, physical or emotional trigger that makes him roll up his mat and leave 75 minutes into the class. If, one night, he decided to hang in and stay in the room past that point, he’d begin to reset his trigger.

You learn new things: If that guy stayed in the room, he might learn that the last 15 minutes are the best part of the class. If he stayed in the room, he might learn some new things about himself. If he stayed in the room, he might learn some new skills. If he stayed in the room, he might learn more about the people around him when he talked with them after class. Those same kinds of lessons are also available by staying in rooms that don’t have anything to do with yoga.

You make progress: If you stay in the room, you give yourself a better chance to make progress. If you stay in the room, you give yourself a better chance to finish something. If you stay in the room, you set the example for others and grow the capacity of your team. As they say at charity auctions, you must be present to win. That’s one more benefit of staying in the room.

What’s your take? What makes you stay in the room or leave? What patterns or lessons have you learned about staying in the room?

(Image via iofoto/Shutterstock.com)

Executive coach Scott Eblin’s goal is to help you succeed at the next level of leadership. Throughout the week, he’ll offer his take on the leadership lessons in the news and his advice on your most pressing leadership questions. A former government executive, Scott is a graduate of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and is the author of The Next Level: What Insiders Know About Executive Success.

FROM OUR SPONSORS
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Close [ x ] More from GovExec
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from GovExec.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Going Agile:Revolutionizing Federal Digital Services Delivery

    Here’s one indication that times have changed: Harriet Tubman is going to be the next face of the twenty dollar bill. Another sign of change? The way in which the federal government arrived at that decision.

    View
  • Cyber Risk Report: Cybercrime Trends from 2016

    In our first half 2016 cyber trends report, SurfWatch Labs threat intelligence analysts noted one key theme – the interconnected nature of cybercrime – and the second half of the year saw organizations continuing to struggle with that reality. The number of potential cyber threats, the pool of already compromised information, and the ease of finding increasingly sophisticated cybercriminal tools continued to snowball throughout the year.

    View
  • Featured Content from RSA Conference: Dissed by NIST

    Learn more about the latest draft of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology guidance document on authentication and lifecycle management.

    View
  • GBC Issue Brief: The Future of 9-1-1

    A Look Into the Next Generation of Emergency Services

    View
  • GBC Survey Report: Securing the Perimeters

    A candid survey on cybersecurity in state and local governments

    View
  • The New IP: Moving Government Agencies Toward the Network of The Future

    Federal IT managers are looking to modernize legacy network infrastructures that are taxed by growing demands from mobile devices, video, vast amounts of data, and more. This issue brief discusses the federal government network landscape, as well as market, financial force drivers for network modernization.

    View
  • eBook: State & Local Cybersecurity

    CenturyLink is committed to helping state and local governments meet their cybersecurity challenges. Towards that end, CenturyLink commissioned a study from the Government Business Council that looked at the perceptions, attitudes and experiences of state and local leaders around the cybersecurity issue. The results were surprising in a number of ways. Learn more about their findings and the ways in which state and local governments can combat cybersecurity threats with this eBook.

    View

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.