Clinton identifies remaining American casualties of Libya attack

The inside of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi was burned in the attack. The inside of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi was burned in the attack. Mohammad Hannon/AP
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton for the first time released the names of two Americans killed in the attack on the U.S. Embassy compound in Libya, recognizing military veterans Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty, who died helping to protect their colleagues.

The State Department had not previously announced the names of security officers Woods and Doherty, who died in the attack in Benghazi that also took the lives of U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and Foreign Service Officer Sean Smith, because it was still making next-of-kin notifications. Armed militants raided the embassy compound on Tuesday night amid protests apparently related related to an American film posted online that many Muslims have found offensive.

"Our thoughts, prayers, and deepest gratitude are with their families and friends," Clinton said in a statement on Thursday night. "Our embassies could not carry on our critical work around the world without the service and sacrifice of brave people like Tyrone and Glen."

Clinton said Woods served as a Navy SEAL for more than two decades, serving multiple tours in Afghanistan, and had protected American diplomatic personnel in Central Asia and the Middle East since 2010. Doherty, also a former Navy SEAL and paramedic, had protected Americans in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries.

"We condemn the attack that took the lives of these heroes in the strongest terms, and we are taking additional steps to safeguard American embassies, consulates, and citizens around the world," Clinton said. "This violence should shock the conscience of people of all faiths and traditions. We appreciate the statements of support that have poured in from across the region and beyond. People of conscience and goodwill everywhere must stand together in these difficult days against violence, hate, and division."
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