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Uri Friedman

Uri Friedman is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Global Channel. He was previously the deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy and a staff writer for The Atlantic Wire.
Results 1-10 of 28

The US-Iran Conflict That Never Happened

January 21, 2016 We have just witnessed one of the most consequential weeks for U.S.-Iran relations since diplomatic ties were broken in 1980, amid the Iranian hostage crisis. Last week began as it ended: with the release of captives. U.S. sailors were seized and set free; international sanctions against Iran were lifted in...

How Harry Truman Announced the Hydrogen Bomb in 1953

January 10, 2016 Thermonuclear weapons, otherwise known as hydrogen bombs or H-bombs, are unimaginably ruinous. In 1952, the United States carried out the first successful test of such a device, which eclipses the lethality of atomic weapons by relying not just on a nuclear-fission explosion, but also a fusion reaction. The testobliterated an...

There's Far More to the Saudi-Iran Feud Than Sunnis-Vs.-Shia

January 7, 2016 In recent days, news of Saudi Arabia’s execution of the Shia leader Nimr al-Nimr, and the diplomatic clashes with Iran that followed, has often been accompanied by an explanation that, in simplified form, goes something like this: The schism between Sunni and Shia Islam is an ancient one, expressed today...

The Global Conflicts to Watch in 2016

December 18, 2015 In the summer of 2012—around the time that the Islamic State’s inchoate plans for a caliphate merited a mere footnote in a U.S. congressional report on the year-old Syrian conflict—Robert Satloff argued that a civil war was taking shape in Syria, and that its terrible consequences would extend far beyond...

Should Mexico Respond to Trump?

September 8, 2015 On Friday, Mexico’s president, Enrique Pena Nieto, made news by commenting on a matter he’d until then remained silent about: Donald Trump. “Some have hoped for the president to take a position on what Trump has said. The government … fully discredits and condemns any expression of a discriminatory character...

Satellite Imagery Is Revolutionizing the Way We Respond to Wars

February 11, 2015 On January 8—just hours after the attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris—reports emerged of another massacre by Islamist extremists, this time in northeastern Nigeria. Compared with the carnage in France, the extent of the destruction in Nigeria was transmitted with far less precision. Some sources said the militant group Boko...

The War America Doesn't Want To Own

January 22, 2015 Tuesday's State of the Union address was the first since 2001 to not mention al-Qaeda. It opened with the promise of a post-post-9/11 era. "We are 15 years into this new century," President Obamaobserved. "Fifteen years that dawned with terror touching our shores; that unfolded with a new generation fighting...

The Global Conflicts To Watch in 2015

December 16, 2014 Foreign policy often involves making difficult and debatable choices about which parts of the world matter more to a given country—and which, by extension, matter less. It's about defining national interests and determining where those interests are most evident and endangered. This is why the United States has done far...

The Syrian Civil War, From Space

December 5, 2014 The ruin brought about by Syria's civil war is difficult to fathom—not only because the death toll is so numbingly high, but because the numbers themselves are so fuzzy. This week, for example, we learned that more than 200,000 people have now died in the three-and-a-half-year conflict—except that the figure,...

Do Police Body Cameras Actually Work?

December 4, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow It may be the most significant reform to follow the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown. On Monday, President Obama requested $75 million in federal funds for a technology that, as he sees it, could help bridge the kinds of rifts between the police and public that surfaced in Ferguson,...