AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Tom Shoop

Vice President and Editor in Chief Tom Shoop is vice president and editor in chief at Government Executive Media Group, where he oversees both print and online editorial operations. He started as associate editor of Government Executive magazine in 1989; launched the company’s flagship website, GovExec.com, in 1996; and was named editor in chief in 2007.
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Outlook: The Good New Days

April 15, 2004 Don't shed a tear for the time when reinventing government was all the rage. few weeks ago on NBC's "The West Wing," President Bartlet's staff felt the need to put the vice president in his place, so that his nascent presidential campaign wouldn't draw attention away from Bartlet's own agenda. ...

Kerry pledges to cut contractors, freeze travel spending

April 7, 2004 Democratic presidential standard-bearer John Kerry pledged Wednesday to cut 100,000 federal contractor jobs and to freeze agencies' travel spending in an effort to trim the federal budget deficit. In an address at Georgetown University in Washington, Kerry said the growing deficit could become a "fiscal cancer," and said he would ...

The Missing Link

April 1, 2004 Lofty rhetoric aside, there's simply no direct line that can be drawn between a federal program's performance and its budget. t's the Holy Grail of federal management: creating a more perfect alignment between budget decisions and the real-world results achieved by programs. Many of the great acronyms of the past-MBO ...

Speak No Evil

March 1, 2004 The only thing more dangerous in government than trying to convey bad news up the hierarchy is going public with it. obody likes to be the bearer of bad news. But in the career federal service, the job comes with the territory. While higher-ups talk of dreams, visions and grand ...

Postal Service runs $3.9B surplus; White House backs reforms

December 9, 2003 The Postal Service announced Tuesday that it finished fiscal 2003 with a $3.9 billion budget surplus, exceeding its projections by $300 million. "These financial results are important to the American consumer and American businesses, for they reinforce our confidence that we can hold current stamp prices unchanged until 2006," said ...

President moves to limit 2004 federal pay raise

August 27, 2003 President Bush issued a plan Wednesday designed to limit the pay increase for white-collar federal employees to an average of 2 percent in 2004. Under a formula included in the 1990 Federal Employees Pay Comparability Act, federal workers covered under the General Schedule would be due a 2.7 percent base ...

House GOP frosh create waste-watching brigade

July 17, 2003 Three freshmen members of Congress have become the latest to launch a crusade against misuse of taxpayer dollars by federal agencies. On Wednesday, Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart and Tom Feeney, both Florida Republicans, and Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, announced the creation of "Washington Waste Watchers: A Working Group to Combat Government Waste, ...

NASA needs management overhaul, shuttle investigators told

June 12, 2003 In its final public hearing Thursday, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board moved beyond the search for the immediate cause of the loss of the space shuttle on Feb. 1 to probe the overall state of NASA's management. Witnesses told panel members that the agency suffers from several key weaknesses, especially ...

Plan for new entry-exit system falls short, report says

June 9, 2003 The plan to create a new entry-exit system to collect information about foreigners who visit the United States lacks key information, such as what the system will cost and how immigration officials at the Homeland Security Department will manage the acquisition process, according to a new General Accounting Office report. ...

Supreme Court refuses to overturn ruling denying vets free health care

June 2, 2003 The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to consider overturning a ruling by a federal appeals court that veterans are not entitled to free lifetime health care, even if recruiters promised they would get it decades ago. During the World War II and Korean War eras, military recruits were often lured ...