AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 61-70 of 247

A New Public Ethos

January 1, 2009 Is the "greed is good" era coming to an end? In reaction to the nation's financial crisis, government has begun a transformation that could usher in a new era of esteem for the public sector. If this happens, it will counter a long-running trend that has seen only temporary bumps ...

Management's Next Challenge

December 24, 2008 Should Barack Obama unveil a formal governmentwide management agenda, as have other recent presidents, and if so, what should it comprise? That topic was addressed by about 30 federal management experts, who spent an afternoon in mid-October discussing what might come next by way of a presidential management initiative. John ...

Management’s Next Challenge

December 1, 2008 Broad bromides should give way to a focus on key priorities. Should Barack Obama unveil a formal governmentwide management agenda, as have other recent presidents, and if so, what should it comprise? That topic was addressed by about 30 federal management experts, who spent an afternoon in mid-October discussing what ...

The Stat Approach

November 26, 2008 In September, the Office of Management and Budget released its final evaluation of the performance of federal programs. This was the last act of OMB's five-year-old PART endeavor, the catchy acronym standing for a clunky title: Performance Assessment Rating Tool. PART found that 80 percent of 1,017 federal programs were ...

The Stat Approach

November 1, 2008 Baltimore's CitiStat holds agencies' feet to the fire. In September, the Office of Management and Budget released its final evaluation of the performance of federal programs. This was the last act of OMB's five-year-old PART endeavor, the catchy acronym standing for a clunky title: Performance Assessment Rating Tool. PART found ...

Reflections on government and nature: summer and fall at Acadia National Park

October 15, 2008 MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, Maine-As I peered into the future last spring, I realized that I might match my obligation (and privilege) to write the "Perspectives" column appearing each month at the end of the magazine with my plan to spend a few weeks on the island that is home to ...

Into the Woods

October 1, 2008 Conservation leaders battle "nature-deficit disorder." Acadia National Park, Maine-Will today's children inherit the conservation ethic that created this beautiful national park and others like it across the country? That question preoccupies the graying leadership of the National Park Service, the Forest Service and others concerned that American's appreciation of nature ...

In the Park

September 1, 2008 In Maine, many players make Acadia hum. Mount Desert Island, Maine-For Sheridan Steele, superintendent of Acadia National Park, and Marla O'Byrne, president of a private group that raises money to support the park, the busiest season has waned with summer's end. Acre for acre, Acadia is the most visited national ...

Everyone a Changemaker

August 1, 2008 The citizen sector's path to a better world. To make the world a better place, many people for many years saw government as the employer of choice. Government remains the most powerful instrument of change. But another sector, run by ordinary and extraordinary citizens, is proving far more innovative-and more ...

Invest and Grow

July 30, 2008 With the Bush administration in full lame-duck mode, every important group in Washington is focusing on the upcoming transition and the policies that our new president might adopt. Management issues, of great interest to senior executives, are one focus of attention. With many agencies now rife with vacancies, reformers are ...