AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 211-220 of 245

The ties that bind

March 1, 2001 Gaining control of the regulatory functions of government will be an important objective for the new administrations. hen we decided last November to monitor the "midnight" regulations expected from the Clinton administration, we had no idea how large this undertaking would turn out to be. But as the weeks passed, ...

For the Common Good

February 1, 2001 ebruary brings the first full month of a new presidency, the new President's first crack at the federal budget, a slew of nominations and confirmation hearings, and a fresh set of minds getting set to take a whack at the same old problems. February also offers us our first opportunity ...

Outlasting Them All

January 1, 2001 s an "end of an administration" party, the elegant Georgetown gathering to honor one of government's most distinguished leaders seemed surreal. Here you had the Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Navy and other short-timers in high government office gathering to celebrate not a retirement, but the staying-on of a ...

Recognizing Excellence

December 1, 2000 s I write, I am looking forward to presiding at two awards ceremonies Government Executive sponsors. The fourth annual Travel Managers of the Year celebration at the end of October and the ninth annual Government Technology Leadership Awards event in late November both recognize high achievement in improving government services. ...

Editor's Notebook
Change Isn't in the Air

November 1, 2000 ill the Nov. 7 election substantially change the role of government in the United States? No. The first presidential election of the 21st century is likely to keep government close to its present course whether the White House goes to Gov. George W. Bush or Vice President Al Gore. The ...

E-Government

October 1, 2000 tclark@govexec.com very week brings fresh evidence of federal agencies' march into the e-government age. At the top of the ambition scale is Firstgov.gov, the Clinton administration's hurry-up effort to construct a Web portal giving citizens the ability to search more than 50 million government Web pages, and to find and ...

People Problems

September 1, 2000 tclark@govexec.com t's too bad that government's reputation remains so poor that our presidential candidates can't bring themselves to promise much-needed reforms. The federal human capital crisis thus remains out of public view during this year's campaigns. In the private sector, by contrast, top executives are closely focused on making sure ...

Fighting for Relevance

August 1, 2000 tclark@govexec.com t is difficult, given the day-to-day demands of professional life, to find time to reflect on how the institutions we serve should be changing to meet the demands of our evolving American experiment. Yet it is a useful exercise, for both people and their organizations can find greater satisfaction ...

The Governance Challenge

July 1, 2000 tclark@govexec.com s a first order of business, we have undertaken to analyze the leadership styles and approaches to governing the two major party candidates would bring to the White House, starting this month with George W. Bush. What Al Gore's record as Vice President and his campaign this year portend ...

In Pursuit of Excellence

June 1, 2000 tclark@govexec.com t the Excellence in Government 2000 conference next month, some 1,500 of your colleagues will gather to discuss current challenges and possible solutions associated with doing the business of the federal government. On behalf of the 16 organizations hosting the event, I am pleased to invite you to join ...