AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 201-210 of 250

New Chapter, Same Verse

February 1, 2002 s this was written, Bush administration leaders were readying the first comprehensive set of policy proposals since Washington and New York were attacked on September 11 for inclusion in the President's State of the Union address and fiscal 2003 budget submission. Reports were circulating that the President would propose not ...

New Chapter, Same Verse

February 1, 2002 s this was written, Bush administration leaders were readying the first comprehensive set of policy proposals since Washington and New York were attacked on September 11 for inclusion in the President's State of the Union address and fiscal 2003 budget submission. Reports were circulating that the President would propose not ...

The Call to Service

January 1, 2002 he American Society for Public Administration is better known for scholarly examinations of government management issues-explored in periodic conferences and published in its journal, the Public Administration Review-than it is for speeches that touch the heart. But in these unusual times, such a speech was delivered in late November to ...

The Case For A Commission

December 1, 2001 es, we should conduct a top-to-bottom review of the sad state of organization of the federal government, as suggested by Paul Light's column this month. Light convincingly calls upon Congress to create a new national commission to restructure the entire federal government for the 21st century. During the 50 years ...

The War Ahead

November 1, 2001 Key agencies have long been starved of the resources they need. e knew, here in Washington, that danger was at hand long before Sept. 11. We knew that our government was not prepared. We knew that preparation would entail hard work and more money and politics beyond the partisan. But ...

Editor’s Notebook: The campaign ahead needs presidential leadership

October 11, 2001 We knew, here in Washington, that danger was at hand long before Sept. 11. We knew that our government was not prepared. We knew that preparation would entail hard work and more money and politics beyond the partisan. But in our deep suspicion of government, in our determination to shrink ...

New Glory

October 1, 2001 he picture, on the covers of The New York Post and Newsweek, of three New York firefighters raising the nation's flag amid the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Center, was one of the most powerful images emerging from the tragedy of Sept. 11. Another poignant scene etches itself in ...

GSA chief praises employees for reaction to attacks

September 20, 2001 Top leaders at the General Services Administration, recent arrivals to federal service from the private sector, on Wednesday expressed deep appreciation for the commitment of their new colleagues in government for their help in making GSA's response to last week's terrorist attacks swift and efficient. The response of GSA's employees ...

Staying Power

September 1, 2001 e passed a milestone last month when our Web site, GovExec.com, celebrated its fifth anniversary. In Internet time, five years is an eon. Lord knows how many dot-coms have come and gone since we started up on Aug. 1, 1996. We're still around, and that is one source of satisfaction. ...

Beyond Bad News

August 1, 2001 embers of Congress and executive branch officials who oversee management of the government have something in common, it strikes me, with us in the press. To wit, there's never a shortage of awful problems about which to comment. It's in the job description and the political genes of legislators to ...