AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 201-210 of 245

Editor’s Notebook: The campaign ahead needs presidential leadership

October 11, 2001 We knew, here in Washington, that danger was at hand long before Sept. 11. We knew that our government was not prepared. We knew that preparation would entail hard work and more money and politics beyond the partisan. But in our deep suspicion of government, in our determination to shrink ...

New Glory

October 1, 2001 he picture, on the covers of The New York Post and Newsweek, of three New York firefighters raising the nation's flag amid the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Center, was one of the most powerful images emerging from the tragedy of Sept. 11. Another poignant scene etches itself in ...

GSA chief praises employees for reaction to attacks

September 20, 2001 Top leaders at the General Services Administration, recent arrivals to federal service from the private sector, on Wednesday expressed deep appreciation for the commitment of their new colleagues in government for their help in making GSA's response to last week's terrorist attacks swift and efficient. The response of GSA's employees ...

Staying Power

September 1, 2001 e passed a milestone last month when our Web site, GovExec.com, celebrated its fifth anniversary. In Internet time, five years is an eon. Lord knows how many dot-coms have come and gone since we started up on Aug. 1, 1996. We're still around, and that is one source of satisfaction. ...

Beyond Bad News

August 1, 2001 embers of Congress and executive branch officials who oversee management of the government have something in common, it strikes me, with us in the press. To wit, there's never a shortage of awful problems about which to comment. It's in the job description and the political genes of legislators to ...

Making Change Happen

July 1, 2001 llow me to indulge in a bit of shameless promotion by calling to your attention the upcoming Excellence in Government 2001 conference, to be held in Washington Aug. 1-3. Yes, I know that we have already sent you, bound into the May issue, the brochure describing the conference program. But ...

Leading True Leaders

June 1, 2001 redemptive rite of Washington's beautiful spring is the annual Senior Executives Association black-tie banquet to honor winners of the Presidential Rank Award. The elegant affair is held in the State Department's 8th floor diplomatic reception rooms, furnished with Thomas Jefferson's desk and other artifacts and paintings important in American history. ...

Back-Office Blues

May 1, 2001 his issue of Government Executive again emphasizes the importance of sound management systems as the sine qua non of effective federal programs. This was a central point too of our mid-April special Federal Performance Report issue, which graded agencies' capabilities in five areas of management on the premise that positive ...

Making the Grades

April 15, 2001 here can be little doubt that the American public holds the federal government in low regard. Movies and television programs portray government workers and officials as bumblers, conspirators or crooks. The news media relentlessly focus on problems and scandals. Candidates for Congress and the presidency unceasingly howl about waste, fraud ...

Overlooking oversight

April 1, 2001 assachusetts boasts a brand of politics and a checkered history unmatched north of Louisiana. Irish shenanigans in the city of Boston are the stuff of legend, celebrated in such great books as Edward O'Connor's The Last Hurrah. The model for O'Connor's Boston mayor was James Michael Curley, who won reelection ...