AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 11-20 of 245

FedPoem: A Ball for 40,000 People

January 18, 2013 FedPoem: Our poet-in-residence was amused when the Obama inaugural team announced there would be only two “official” inaugural balls—one for 4,000 honoring the military, and another for 40,000 people—twice as many as can fit in the Verizon Center for a Washington Wizards game. It seemed the White House was trying ...

FedPoem: Ode to the Trillion Dollar Coin

January 16, 2013 Editor's Note: Here's the latest from our own poet laureate of the federal world, Tim Clark. If you haven't already, be sure to check out his his first effort, on would-be Treasury Secretary Jack Lew's loopy signature. Platinum Blues It seemed so simple, so savvy, so smart, Like an elegant ...

A Poetic Tribute to Lew's Loopy Signature

January 11, 2013 Editor’s Note: In what we can only hope will be the first of many doggerel posts, Editor at Large Tim Clark has come through with a piece of verse dedicated to the now-infamous signature of Jack Lew President Obama’s Treasury secretary nominee. From Hamilton to Lew Alexander the first must ...

The Big Fix

December 1, 2012 If government is broken, as many believe, then what can be done to fix it? For one wide-ranging set of answers, we can turn to the Memos to National Leaders project mounted this year by the National Academy of Public Administration and the American Society of Public Administration to address ...

United We Stand

November 1, 2012 Soon after the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979, an American delegation visited the region to reassure Saudi Arabia and other nearby states that the United States would stand by them as the consequences of the Iranian revolution played out. Defense Secretary Harold Brown, leading the delegation, asked ...

Budget Musings

October 1, 2012 With the presidential election seeming to ride on voters’ views about the size and scope of the federal government, I ran a little test this summer among highly educated people I know. Asked what share of the U.S. workforce is represented by federal employment, one answered 20 percent. Surely it ...

Lessons on Finding Fair Pay For Feds

September 26, 2012 Toward the end of his richly anecdotal book, Who Gets What, compensation expert Kenneth R. Feinberg observes that when considering the fairness of pay, “everybody counts other people’s money.” Money, of course, is a key signal of success in our market economy. And federal workers today are increasingly subjected to ...

Fair Pay For Feds

September 1, 2012 Toward the end of his richly anecdotal book, Who Gets What, compensation expert Kenneth R. Feinberg observes that when considering the fairness of pay, “everybody counts other people’s money.” Money, of course, is a key signal of success in our market economy. And federal workers today are increasingly subjected to ...

What do people want from government?

August 10, 2012 How much government do people want? With the presidential election approaching, answers to that question could shed light not only on prospects for the candidates, but also on their ability to reshape the public sector if elected. Historians would note the nation was founded in revolution against oppressive government. And ...

Clipped Wings

August 1, 2012 How much government do people want? With the presidential election approaching, answers to that question could shed light not only on prospects for the candidates, but also on their ability to reshape the public sector if elected. Historians would note the nation was founded in revolution against oppressive government. And ...