AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 171-180 of 245

Corporate Government

August 1, 2003 ermit me to float a theorem: Government now owes the success or the failure of its highest-visibility programs as much to private sector performance as to the actions of its own employees. If this seems a touch hyperbolic now, it probably won't as time passes and agencies increase their reliance ...

Keeping Track

July 1, 2003 ig Brother has come to American campuses, as our cover illustration ominously suggests. By August, the Homeland Security Department's project to register and track foreign students will have amassed data about 1.2 million people, offering the government the capability to track lack of attendance, or shifts in majors, or disciplinary ...

The Competitive Edge

June 15, 2003 hen the staff of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee five years ago thought up the idea of inventorying government jobs to identify those that were not inherently governmental, few had much of an inkling that this would be the start of something big. Even when the agencies, responding to the ...

Truth and Power

June 1, 2003 hat can be done to encourage public servants to give political decision makers unbiased advice about the policies they wish to pursue and the likely consequences of them-resisting temptation to tell their political bosses just what they want to hear? The importance of "speaking truth to power" was among topics ...

War and Remembrance

May 1, 2003 n April 7, the Government Executive staff welcomed our colleague George Cahlink as he came home from reporting on the war on Iraq. Cahlink had done terrific work from posts on the aircraft carrier USS Constellation, the cruiser USS Bunker Hill and in the port of Umm Qasr, describing for ...

The Fight at Home

April 15, 2003 s the war abroad consumed the attention of the American public, the fight at home to improve domestic security was crowded out of the media spotlight. But that fight was no less urgent, nor any easier to win. In this special issue on homeland security, Government Executive examines the most ...

An Education in Excellence

April 1, 2003 ound into the center of this issue is the program of this year's Excellence in Government conference, to be held in Washington June 30-July 2. In promotional literature, we say this is the only general management conference "designed for federal managers by federal managers," and I can testify that the ...

Bringing Agencies Up to the Task

March 1, 2003 mericans are proud people-proud of our freedom, prosperity, and the spirit of innovation that keeps our country moving. We most surely treasure the political system that has nurtured our liberty and growth, even as many of us would never admit to pride in the government it has spawned. Government, our ...

Sweeping Reform

February 1, 2003 or the second time in the past three years, an important private sector commission has called for sweeping reorganization of the federal government and major improvements in its approach to staffing agencies. The new report was issued last month by the National Commission on the Public Service, chaired by Paul ...

The Next Wave

January 1, 2003 n the waves of change that are beginning to sweep through the federal personnel structure, one looms as a potential tsunami-the Navy's bold bid to move to a market-based approach to hiring, assignments and promotions. Revolutionary change is coming because Navy leaders have concluded that they can no longer afford ...