AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 161-170 of 253

Grades Are In

July 15, 2004 The Bush administration gets a B for effort. For the management reform program he has pursued since taking office, President Bush earns a solid B for effort and a slightly lower grade, C+ to B-, for results. That's the verdict rendered by nine knowledgeable observers I consulted in early July. ...

Management Counts

July 1, 2004 So far, John Kerry has ceded the vision of government efficiency to the president. Does it matter that John F. Kerry isn't paying much attention to executive branch management? We would answer yes. Like motherhood, good management is a laudable virtue, and Lord knows that government could use more of ...

Of Bees and Guns

June 15, 2004 …as parables of gridlock in government. In a small story, we journalists can sometimes find a perfect parable to make a larger point. Years ago, writing about Jimmy Carter's budget-trimming program, I stumbled on the Beekeepers Indemnity Fund, a tiny federal program that compensated a handful of honeymen if their ...

Self-Inflicted Wounds

June 1, 2004 …contributing to the decline of the public sector. As a partisan of the public sector, it pains me to see it in decline. Our democracy can only suffer if citizens think poorly of their government. And it's simply tragic that so many of the wounds are self-inflicted-as one can sense ...

Gridlock and Bliss

May 15, 2004 Gridlock in the air lanes, married bliss, and goodbye to Tom Novotny and Mary McGrory. Passengers fuming in airports during the long hot summer of 2000 pointed the finger of blame at the airlines. Another summer of delay is likely this year, and the problem will lie as much with ...

Telling Our Stories

May 1, 2004 With strong photos and illustrations, and tight writing and editing, we tell our stories more effectively. Few topics are as top-of-mind as the security problems that afflict American forces and their contractors in Iraq. The difficulties range beyond the wrenching toll of dead and wounded that makes the news every ...

Editor's Notebook: The New Look

April 15, 2004 ith this issue of Government Executive, we are excited to unveil a more modern look. We hope you will be excited too, as you see bigger and better photographs, more imaginative on-point illustrations, and a design that's intended to give you a faster grasp of important elements of the stories ...

To Our Readers

April 1, 2004 fter 35 years in business as a monthly magazine, Government Executive this month will adopt a biweekly publishing schedule during most of the year. At the same time, our next issue will unveil a completely new look. One might ask: Why the change? First, we detect demand for more information. ...

Winter Budget Blues

March 1, 2004 hen Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his lair on Feb. 2, Groundhog Day once more affirmed that winter had not run its course. Declared Phil: "Today because my shadow I see, six more weeks of winter there will be." That very day, President Bush released his budget for fiscal 2005, and ...

The Players

February 15, 2004 hree years ago, few people had ever heard the phrase "homeland security," and the very idea had little meaning outside of several think tanks and government commissions. But in the wake of the terrorist attacks on the United States in September 2001, the U.S. government has established a huge, new ...