AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Timothy B. Clark

Editor at Large Tim Clark served as editor in chief, publisher and president of Government Executive in the years since it was acquired by National Journal Group in 1987. He and his colleagues have built Government Executive into an essential source for federal managers, a shaper of the government management debate and a key player in the good-government movement. Clark has spent his journalistic career studying and writing about government, and is a founder of National Journal, Washington’s premier source of political insight. He also founded Empire State Report, a monthly magazine about government in New York. He is a fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration.
Results 1-10 of 325

Legal Shootout at the Broadband Corral

April 11, 2018 In the nationwide struggle to preserve cities’ rights to regulate broadband carriers, the city of McAllen, Texas, occupies a singular perch, and its city attorney, Kevin D. Pagan, has achieved a moment in the spotlight. McAllen is at the top of the list of 31 cities that are plaintiffs in...

Preemption Battles Continue as Cities Look to Improve Internet Connectivity

April 6, 2018 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The day before the Georgia State Legislature wrapped up its session on March 30, the House passed a controversial bill to assert the state’s power over its local governments in the fraught debate about who should set the terms for deployment of broadband technology. The vote was 143-10. But even...

Preemption Battles Continue as Cities Look to Improve Internet Connectivity

April 5, 2018 The day before the Georgia State Legislature wrapped up its session on March 30, the House passed a controversial bill to assert the state’s power over its local governments in the fraught debate about who should set the terms for deployment of broadband technology. The vote was 143-10. But even...

Struggling Mill Town Hopes for Aquaculture-Fueled Recovery

March 14, 2018 In a tale of remarkable resiliency, a suffering old mill town on the banks of the Penobscot River in Maine has engineered a feat of renewal and an important role in a new but fast-growing business of raising salmon for consumption in the hungry American market. Whole Oceans LLC, a...

Seeking Startups in the Heartland

February 13, 2018 For officials attending the U.S. Conference of Mayors winter meeting in Washington, D.C. in late January, the topic of job creation was high on the agenda. So it was that job creators speaking at the final plenary session on “The Future of Work” attracted much interest with their vision of...

How an Innovative Tech Fund Is Helping to Expand Internet Access in California’s Low-Income Communities

December 10, 2017 Over the past 10 years, a remarkable institution in California has been fueling sustained progress in closing the digital divide, bringing many thousands of low-income households the benefits of broadband internet services. Now, with its original source of funding at an end, the California Emerging Technology Fund is working to...

Corruption in the Cross Hairs as New Yorkers Go to Polls

October 31, 2017 Bill Samuels is an unreconstructed reformer who has devoted much of his life, and a lot of money he earned in business, to cleaning up state and municipal government in New York. Now, he’s the driving force behind a once-in-a-generation opportunity to rewrite the constitution of the Empire State. Samuels...

Coalition of Strange Bedfellows Opposes N.Y. Constitutional Convention Proposal

October 23, 2017 From its perch above the Hudson River 150 miles north of New York City, Albany, capital of the Empire State, is a place that has launched many a distinguished political career. From Theodore Roosevelt a century ago, to Nelson Rockefeller 50 years ago to Chuck Schumer and Andrew Cuomo in...

Controversy Continues to Dog New National Monument in Maine

October 9, 2017 MILLINOCKET, Maine — Tim Hudson’s well-marked and tidy office on the main street of this town, and his distinctive National Park Service uniform, convey a message about the federal government’s determination to exercise its powers over the new Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, a tract of 87,500 acres a...

Hartford Nears Bankruptcy as State Aid Remains Uncertain

September 12, 2017 Connecticut’s capital city has renewed its plea for substantial state aid to avert a bankruptcy filing Mayor Luke Bronin says could occur by the end of October. The six-page letter Bronin and other city officials sent to Gov. Dannel P. Malloy and state legislative leaders last week helped turn up...