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Growing Managers

April 13, 2005 Are good leaders made or are they born? Increasingly, that's the dilemma in government, where 75 percent of top civil service executives are older than 50 and nearly half are over 55. Soon they'll retire and will have to be replaced. But budget constraints have taken a toll on the...

Executives continue to earn high performance marks

April 8, 2005 Agencies continued to rate the performance of their senior executives at very high levels in 2003, according to new data released by the Office of Personnel Management. The percentage of career senior executives given their agencies' highest possible rating was 74.5 percent in 2003, just one-tenth of 1 percent lower...

New Day at EPA

April 1, 2005 Changes at the agency's procurement shop have improved morale and customer service. During the 1990s, new rules governing the way government agencies buy goods and services shook some fundamental truths about procurement culture. Traditionally, an agency's procurement shop had been its only agent when it needed to buy anything. The...

National EEOC call center opens amid controversy

March 29, 2005 Bucking complaints from its employee union and some Democrats in Congress, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last week opened the phone lines at its first nationwide call center. Staffed with employees of Arlington, Va.-based Pearson Government Solutions and located in Lawrence, Kan., the EEOC National Contact Center is taking calls...

The Front Line

March 15, 2005 President George W. Bush is pushing for epochal changes in the civil service. The job of pushing the reforms out into agencies, often over objections by unions, employees, legislators and managers, will fall to government's human resources leaders, its chief human capital officers. In his 2006 budget proposal, Bush proposed...

Personnel reform may be hard sell for Bush administration

March 8, 2005 When the history of the Bush administration is written, it will include detailed chapters on the Sept. 11 attacks, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the effort to revamp Social Security. It's also likely to include a section on a less heralded initiative to hammer home the most far-reaching...

DHS employee appeals go to the top of the pile

March 7, 2005 In an effort to meet strict new processing standards that the Homeland Security Department will mandate later this year, the Merit Systems Protection Board's Washington-based Office of Appeals Counsel has launched a formal process of reviewing DHS cases before most cases from other agencies. "Our goal is not to have...

MSPB chairman says DHS personnel changes will overburden judges

March 2, 2005 The chairman of the Merit System Protection Board told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday that disciplinary process changes soon to take hold at the Homeland Security Department would put employee rights at risk and overburden MSPB's judges. MSPB is an independent federal agency that adjudicates employee appeals of agency disciplinary actions....

Rankled Staff

March 1, 2005 After more than a year of wrangling with employee unions, the Homeland Security Department in late January issued final regulations to replace decades-old civil service rules with a new personnel system. The plan is that employees will receive raises based on performance and market conditions, and department managers will have...

Smooth Operator

March 1, 2005 IRS' human capital officer is on a diplomatic mission to break in the agency's new pay system. As the Defense and Homeland Security departments ramp up new personnel systems-a source of sometimes bitter debate between department leaders and employees-pay for performance is already on the job at the Internal Revenue...