AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Rebecca Carroll

Senior Correspondent Before joining Government Executive’s editing team, Rebecca Carroll wrote and edited for The Associated Press in Washington, New York and Bangkok, and for National Geographic News. She also was a Peace Corps volunteer in China, where she returned to study at the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing University Center. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, with a double major in English and Philosophy.
Results 21-30 of 85

Feds Want Backpack Radiation Detectors That Don’t Use Rare Gas

July 17, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The government is looking for backpack-based radiation detection systems that don’t require an increasingly rare isotope of helium traditionally used in such devices. The Defense and Homeland Security departments want to test the radiation detectors against current standards as part of a program to develop a shared data system that ...

The Pattern in CDC's Mishandling of Anthrax, Bird Flu and Botulism

July 16, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow An inadequate culture of safety led to a recent incident in which 84 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention employees could have been exposed to anthrax, the head of the agency told lawmakers Wednesday. CDC last week acknowledged that potentially viable anthrax samples were transferred to an insufficiently secure laboratory ...

HHS Announces New Open Gov Projects, Wants to Know What You Think

July 15, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Releasing more data proactively and creating easier access to what’s already available are the key goals behind the Department of Health and Human Services' latest open government plan. The department is currently developing a policy to help the public use federally funded scientific publications. Four participating agencies -- the National ...

Commerce Has the Best Data, Will Hire Chief Data Officer, Secretary Says

July 14, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker spoke Monday at a conference in California held by mapping software company Esri. Here are some highlights from her remarks, as prepared for delivery. On the Commerce Department having the best data: It is not hyperbole to call the Department of Commerce, “America’s Data Agency.” No ...

If You’re Anonymously Editing Wikipedia from Capitol Hill, Everyone Will Know

July 14, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow There are socially acceptable ways to edit Wikipedia; anonymously from congressional offices is not among them. Although Capitol Hill Wikipedia readers might have gotten away with the odd anonymous edit before last week, those changes are now tracked by @Congressedits, a self-described “bot that tweets anonymous Wikipedia edits that are ...

DHS Is Prepared to Spend Big on Wearable Radiation Detectors

July 10, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Department of Homeland Security needs at least 26 wearable radiation detection systems, possibly worth a total of $24 million, the agency has announced. The devices will notify wearers -- initially in the Coast Guard, Customs and Border Protection and Transportation Security Administration -- when radiation is present and identify ...

What Will Happen When Computer Chips Stop Getting Smaller?

July 10, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow IBM is spending $3 billion to figure out what will happen when computer power stops doubling every few years. The strange phenomenon -- called Moore’s Law -- was described in 1965 by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore, who predicted the number of circuits that can fit on a processor would double ...

Why the Government Is Looking for Water Guns This Summer

July 8, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow It’s no secret that silver carp jump in response to boat motors, so it was pretty natural -- for a few federal scientists, anyway -- to wonder how the highly invasive fish would handle powerful pulses from water guns initially used for seismic surveys. Researchers have been on the case ...

Why the Government Is Probably About to Go on a Spending Spree

July 7, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Agencies didn’t always save the bulk of their spending for September, but that’s how it has worked out recently – and this year, the pattern is especially pronounced, according to an analysis by Deltek. Agencies will make 35.4 percent of their 2014 purchases between this month and the end of ...

Governments Could Make or Break the Free Internet in the Next 10 Years

July 3, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Here are two ways governments could undermine Internet freedom in the coming decade: They could block and filter it more, and they could stir greater mistrust by using it to conduct more intrusive surveillance programs against citizens. That’s according to a canvassing of more than 1,400 experts conducted by the ...