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The New Public Service

January 1, 2000 plight@govexec.com he civil service is facing its most profound challenge since Congress created the merit system a century ago. That system has been replaced by a flexible, multi-sectored public service spanning government, nonprofit agencies and even private firms. This new public service is characterized by change more than constancy. But...

Law Passes, Clinton Fails

December 1, 1999 plight@govexec.com lexander Hamilton would have had plenty to say about the future of the National Nuclear Stewardship Administration, which came to life by law for a brief moment last month before President Clinton announced he would never implement it. Hamilton believed that a government ill-executed, no matter what it might...

Worth the Price of Confetti

November 1, 1999 ith exactly a year until the 2000 election, it is still not too late for Congress to give the next administration a chance to hit the ground running by providing the funds for pre-election transition planning. The funding would yield dividends far into the future. We can pay the candidates...

Behold Lake Wobegon East

October 1, 1999 ost federal managers have now finished the most meaningless task of their year: rating their employees using a nearly useless performance appraisal system. If the past is any guide, their subordinates were not only all above average, they were just about outstanding. Lake Wobegon has nothing on Washington. The hyperinflation...

Talent Pool Runs Dry

September 1, 1999 here is deeply troubling news elsewhere in this issue of Government Executive on the future of the public service. Simply stated, the federal talent pool is about to start draining out with little or nothing in the pipeline to replace it. It is a crisis of staggering, if quiet, proportions,...

Los Alamos' Hidden Lesson

August 1, 1999 plight@govexec.com mericans got a highly visible and all-too-rare lesson in the importance of government organization last month when former Sen. Warren Rudman, R-N.H., and his colleagues on the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board released their critical report on the nation's nuclear weapons laboratories. Blasting the Energy Department for "organizational disarray,...

A President's Just Due

July 1, 1999 cting with little public notice last month, a House subcommittee decided to give the President of the United States a $200,000 pay increase to $400,000 a year. The increase comes after a 30-year freeze. Caught red-faced after Washington Post writer Stephen Barr found the increase buried in the very last...

The Public Service

June 1, 1999 s the year 2000 presidential campaign heats up, hopefuls in both parties appear ready to engage in a bidding war to see just how small the federal government can get. The word around Washington is that Vice President Al Gore will soon ask for the buyout authority to implement a...

All's Not Always FAIR

May 1, 1999 ust when federal departments and agencies thought they had learned all the important acronyms that rule their lives-GPRA, NPR and the like-the Office of Management and Budget released its rules for implementing FAIR on March 1. The letters stand for Federal Activities Inventory Reform. Passed with minimal debate in Congress...

The Public Service

April 1, 1999 plight@govexec.com inished with his two-year investigation of campaign finance and liberated from the impeachment scandal, Rep. Dan Burton, R-Ind., recently announced that his House Government Reform Committee intends to hunt down "problem child" federal agencies as part of a new attack on fraud, waste and abuse. The hunt is likely...