AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Patrick Tucker

Patrick Tucker is technology editor for Defense One. He’s also the author of The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move? (Current, 2014). Previously, Tucker was deputy editor for The Futurist for nine years. Tucker has written about emerging technology in Slate, The Sun, MIT Technology Review, Wilson Quarterly, The American Legion Magazine, BBC News Magazine, Utne Reader, and elsewhere.
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NSA: Rules of War Apply to Cyberwar, Too

April 20, 2015 The Pentagon keeps its rapidly expanding cyber arsenal almost entirely secret, which helps keep U.S. capabilities potent but also hinders the public’s ability to meaningfully discuss their use and costs. The development of new worms or viruses doesn’t show up in the President’s annual budget request in the same way ...

NSA Chief: Rules of War Apply to Cyberwar, Too

April 20, 2015 The Pentagon keeps its rapidly expanding cyber arsenal almost entirely secret, which helps keep U.S. capabilities potent but also hinders the public’s ability to meaningfully discuss their use and costs. The development of new worms or viruses doesn’t show up in the President’s annual budget request in the same way ...

New Pentagon Chief Carter to Court Silicon Valley

April 16, 2015 The Pentagon desperately wants to be more agile and flexible, but decades of cultural bureaucracy often prevent the nation’s largest organization from being that. Now, a tech-savvy physicist is in charge of the military and he is about to ask companies like Google and Facebook for solutions. Next week, Ashton ...

The Navy is Preparing To Launch Swarm Bots Out of Cannons

April 14, 2015 The U.S. Navy will launch up to 30 synchronized drones within one minute, possibly from a single cannon-like device, in what marks a significant advance in robot autonomy. The drones, when airborne, will then unfold their wings and conduct a series of maneuvers and simulated missions with very little human ...

Army Wants Robot Four-Wheelers and Decepticons

April 14, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Nearly 10 years ago, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, or DARPA, showed that a self-driving car could navigate a 132-mile stretch of desert. That proof-of-concept test, DARPA Grand Challenge (2005), sought simply to illustrate how military resupply might be made less risky. (It also became the basis for Google's ...

Pentagon Seeks Sensors That Last for Years

April 13, 2015 For decades, the military has been looking for ways to collect data and information in places that it can’t put people. One method for doing that is cheap sensors that can be left on the battlefield for extended periods of time, long after soldiers have returned home. Case in point: ...

The Army Wants Robot Four-Wheelers and Decepticons

April 12, 2015 Nearly 10 years ago, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, or DARPA, showed that a self-driving car could navigate a 132-mile stretch of desert. That proof-of-concept test, DARPA Grand Challenge (2005), sought simply to illustrate how military resupply might be made less risky. (It also became the basis for Google’s ...

Can the Military Make a Prediction Machine?

April 8, 2015 What could the military do if it could better understand the massive amounts of data that humanity creates, an estimated 2.5 quintillion bytes every day? Could it predict aspects of the future? If Pentagon funds can help create—even partially—a machine capable of understanding cause and effect, or causality, and do ...

US Military to Deploy Robotic Ghost Ships This Fall

April 3, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow How do you keep track of increasingly stealthy Russian, Chinese, and Iranian submarines? If you're the U.S. military, you build a robotic ghost ship to follow them around the high seas. In 2010, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, announced that they were building a 132-foot autonomous boat ...

Special Report: To Protect Ourselves From Bioweapons, We May Have to Reinvent Science Itself

April 2, 2015 In January 2012, a team of researchers from the Netherlands and the University of Wisconsin published a paper in the journal Science about airborne transmission of H5N1 influenza, or bird flu, in ferrets. The article changed the way the United States and nations around the world approached manmade biological threats. ...