AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Patrick Tucker

Patrick Tucker is technology editor for Defense One. He’s also the author of The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move? (Current, 2014). Previously, Tucker was deputy editor for The Futurist, where he served for nine years. Tucker's writing on emerging technology also has appeared in Slate, The Sun, MIT Technology Review, Wilson Quarterly, The American Legion Magazine, BBC News Magazine and Utne Reader among other publications.
Results 1-10 of 183

Here’s When the Next Incursion Into Ukraine Could Happen

March 31, 2015 If you think the ceasefire between Ukraine and Russian-backed militants is fragile today, wait until next week. After Easter Sunday, pro-Moscow forces could begin a spring offensive lasting until (Russian) V-E Day, or May 9. That’s the prediction of retired Gen. Wesley Clark, former NATO supreme allied commander and U.S. ...

This Duck Drone Could Spy on Enemy Subs

March 30, 2015 Nature, which has no need for devices that spy on enemy submarines from the air and underwater, may nevertheless have invented their form: flying fish, for example, or ducks that can zoom over the water’s surface and dive beneath to feed. But the Navy Research Lab, or NRL, which is ...

Pentagon: Yes, Taking Tikrit Just Got Harder

March 27, 2015 The departure of the Iranians from the battlefield of Tikrit will likely prolong ISIS’s presence around the city, say Pentagon officials. Today, Pentagon officials acknowledged that “hundreds of enemy” ISIS fighters remain around the besieged Iraqi city. When asked if the departure of the Iranian-backed Shi’ite militias would make it ...

What is Coming From DARPA in the Next Few Years

March 26, 2015 To reduce the price of weapons and other gear by creating new solutions to old problems–or “rethink complex military systems,” as deputy director Steven Walker of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency puts it–is among DARPA’s focus areas for the next few years. This week, the agency highlighted potential solutions ...

The World of 2020 According to DARPA

March 26, 2015 To reduce the price of weapons and other gear by creating new solutions to old problems–or “rethink complex military systems,” as deputy director Steven Walker of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency puts it–is among DARPA’s focus areas for the next few years. This week, the agency highlighted potential solutions ...

The Military’s Robotic Ghost Ship Passes Critical Test

March 24, 2015 How do you keep track of increasingly stealthy Russian, Chinese and Iranian submarines? If you’re the U.S. military, you build a robotic ghost ship to follow them around the high seas. In 2010, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, announced that they were building a 132-foot autonomous boat ...

War by Doxxing

March 23, 2015 Over the weekend, a pro-ISIS group identifying itself as the Islamic State Hacking Division posted on YouTube the names, photos and purported addresses of 100 American combat pilots and other military personnel. Some of the targets had been involved in coalition airstrikes against the Islamic State, while others had not. ...

The Air Force Might Have To Protect Money Laundering in Space

March 22, 2015 If you’re looking for the ultimate in physical security for your future assets, look up, way up. Growing fears about cybersecurity and the rapidly decreasing cost to access space has given birth to a new class of startups offering satellite-based data centers impervious to all physical hacking. What sort of ...

Three Steps To Destroy ISIS on Twitter

March 18, 2015 AUSTIN, Texas – For the Islamic State, or ISIS, the social media site Twitter, with its 288 million users, remains core to the group’s recruiting, messaging and communication. A new report estimates there are possibly as many as 90,000 Twitter accounts that support ISIS, fueling the popular narrative that Twitter ...

The Military's New Bid to Protect Your Data

March 13, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The average, technologically connected American worker produces some 5,000 megabytes of digital data a day, enough to fill nine CD-ROMs. Only a small fraction of it is stored permanently or is clearly related to a specific identity, but the sheer volume of digital exhaust that is daily life has turned ...