AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Norm Ornstein

Norm Ornstein is a correspondent for The Atlantic, a contributing editor and columnist for National Journal, and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research.
Results 11-20 of 23

Why It's So Hard for Obama to Be Tough on Russia

March 13, 2014 It is not uncommon for second-term presidents to turn more of their attention and focus to foreign policy. Domestic politics and policy become increasingly frustrating, as the president’s partisans in Congress hunker down in preparation for a lousy midterm election, the party’s ideological base becomes more belligerent, and the opposition ...

Why It's So Hard for the U.S. to Take Tough Action Against Russia

March 13, 2014 It is not uncommon for second-term presidents to turn more of their attention and focus to foreign policy. Domestic politics and policy become increasingly frustrating, as the president’s partisans in Congress hunker down in preparation for a lousy midterm election, the party’s ideological base becomes more belligerent, and the opposition ...

Analysis: Henry Waxman: A Relic of the Era When Congress Used to Work

February 6, 2014 I was introduced to Congress in 1965 by a newly minted professor at the University of Minnesota, Gene Eidenberg, who had come to the state fresh from a stint as an American Political Science Association congressional fellow working for the late Hale Boggs, the majority whip. Eidenberg sat across from ...

Analysis: Budget Deal May Not Herald the End of Congressional Dysfunction

December 19, 2013 The successful budget deal forged by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, and its wide margin of approval in the House, have had many observers suggesting the political system may have turned a corner in its dysfunction. Its small-bore and cramped ambitions notwithstanding, the deal is an important achievement, ...

Analysis: Time to Stop the Senate Filibuster Madness

November 7, 2013 This is a column of shout-outs—and call-outs. First, the shout-outs, starting with John Y. McCollister, who died recently at age 92 in Omaha, Neb. The name will be unfamiliar to most readers, but the cognoscenti will know John Y., as everyone called him, as a Republican member of Congress who ...

The White House's Original Sin: A Failure of Effective Management

October 24, 2013 The HealthCare.gov debacle has been thoroughly dissected so far by America's best health journalists and policy analysts. To be sure, every major rollout of a new or changed social policy, including Medicare itself, is rough and takes weeks or months to resolve. But this rollout is clearly worse, and, as ...

Analysis: The Sequester Is a Disaster, and Congress's Next Move May Be Worse

September 19, 2013 As readers of my past columns know, I was not exactly optimistic as we approached crunch time over the debt limit in 2011. But I am far more pessimistic now. At a dinner I attended Monday night with a host of those individuals deeply involved in fiscal matters, it became ...

Analysis: The U.S. Government Still Isn't Ready for a Catastrophic Terror Attack

September 13, 2013 I write this on the bright and sunny morning of September 11. Exactly 12 years ago, I was on my way to Dulles Airport. As I drove on the access road, convertible top down, I marveled at the beauty of the day. When I parked and went inside to get ...

Why Going to Congress For a Vote on Strikes in Syria Was a Major Risk

September 5, 2013 I had a robust list of topics I was going to write about after Labor Day, but how can one write this week about anything other than President Obama's surprising (to say the least) announcement that he would submit to Congress a resolution to authorize the use of force in ...

Analysis: McCain May Be Our Only Hope for Forging Fiscal Deal

August 8, 2013 With Congress away for the next month, it gives us time to pause and consider the various train wrecks that lie ahead when the members return Sept. 9—and we are talking train wrecks of the deadly variety. Three weeks after Congress returns, the new fiscal year will start; most of ...