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A Prosthetic Limb, Controlled by an Amputee's Thoughts

June 14, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Cyborgs are here -- or, at least, they're in DARPA laboratories. For a while now, the Defense Department agency, alongside civilian researchers, has been working to develop prosthetic limbs that can be controlled by the brains -- as in, the thoughts -- of their wearers. And one of the most ...

Oops! This Lab Neglected to Return the Samples of Moondust NASA Loaned It

May 31, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In 1969, after the Apollo 11 crew returned from their historic mission to the moon, the rocks and soil samples they collected were put to use in scientific research. NASA divided the lunar spoils Armstrong and Aldrin had gathered so painstakingly into small vials, sending the samples out to more ...

The Future of the Spacesuit

May 30, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow NASA's first spacewalk, during the Gemini IV mission of 1965, came uncomfortably close to losing an astronaut. Ed White, stepping out into the abyss, found himself overcome with the joy that is sometimes referred to, fittingly, as "space euphoria." Floating in space was "the most natural feeling," he enthused to ...

Your Smartphone, Made of Cement

May 28, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Straw into gold. Water into wine. Servant into princess. It's a longstanding obsession of human myth-making: turning one thing into another thing -- a lowly thing into a vaunted thing -- by way of miracle or magic. Well, someone get Joseph Campbell. Because science has just found another way to ...

A Robot Just Broke the Human Record for Miles Driven in Space

May 17, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In December of 1972, the Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt got to do something awesome: They took a joyride on the moon. A long one. The pair piloted their mission's Lunar Roving Vehicle 19.3 nautical miles (which is also 22.210 statute miles, or 35.744 kilometers) over the ...

Space Is Now a Reality TV Show

May 14, 2013 "Why are people so fascinated with @Cmdr_Hadfield?" the tweeter asked. "Can someone enlighten me?" The answers were swift and sharp and unsurprising. "Dude, he's a frigging astronaut!" one replied. "Um, he's an astronaut?" another offered. "What else do you need?" Someone else explained things with a little more detail: "He's ...

Would You Take a One Way Ticket to Mars?

April 29, 2013 If you are at least 18 years of age and curious and capable and resourceful, with a capacity for self-reflection, an ability to trust other people, and a deep sense of purpose, then you can to go to Mars. Maybe. The Mars One project, which is planning to send a ...

Need to Test the World's Largest Particle Accelerator? Try a Ping-Pong Ball

April 18, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Large Hadron Collider, the largest and highest-energy particle accelerator in the world -- the thing some people once feared would destroy the Earth, and the thing which so far has not -- is a complicated piece of machinery. It is composed of eight straight sections joined together by eight ...

Astronauts' Favorite Space Food: Shrimp Cocktail

April 10, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Here's the thing about space food. While it might seem exotic to people here on Earth -- to people who live in some relative proximity to a farm or a grocery store -- space food is awesome only in the sense that it is eaten in space. Otherwise, the stuff ...

What Became of the Parachute That Delivered Curiosity to Mars?

April 4, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Remember the "seven minutes of terror"? Those tense, breathtaking moments, back in August, between the descent of the spacecraft carrying the Mars Curiosity rover into the Martian atmosphere and the vehicle's (ultimately successful) landing on Mars? NASA remembers. So it periodically checks up on one of the tools that allowed ...