AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Mark Micheli

Editor, Excellence in Government Mark Micheli is Special Projects Editor for Government Executive Media Group. He's the editor of Excellence in Government Online and contributes to GovExec, NextGov and Defense One. Previously, he worked on national security and emergency management issues with the US Treasury Department and the Department of Homeland Security. He's a graduate of the Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs and studied at Drake University.
Results 21-30 of 221

How The States Got Their Names

July 22, 2013 Among the many things I take for granted while exploring new places are names. I recently took a trip that had me hit up Wyoming, Utah and Idaho (really, the best tri-state combination there is) and never stopped to ponder, where did these states get their names? The below infographic ...

What Do George W. Bush and World Wrestling Have in Common?

July 18, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A new analysis of the most controversial topics on Wikipedia shows that, among other things, the legacy of President George W. Bush is far from settled. A team of researchers from Hungary, Oxford and Rutgers found that the most controversial topics in the English language version of Wikipedia include hot ...

How the Defense Department Communicates

July 16, 2013 Listen to the story: Download this episode | Subscribe on iTunes Looking for more defense news? Introducing Defense One, delivering the news, analysis and ideas that will define the future of U.S. national security. Visit DefenseOne.com Thanks to sequestration and the excellent timing of the GSA conference scandal, travel restrictions ...

Infographic: The Benefits of Biking to Work

July 15, 2013 If you live anywhere along the eastern seaboard, biking to work may not be up your alley this week—with high humidity and scorching heat projected through most of the week. But if you’re willing to sweat a little (or a lot), the benefits of biking to work are pretty significant. ...

3-D Printing Could Transform NASA

July 15, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow 3-D printing represents a potential game changer for NASA and the US space program. In June, a 3-D printer passed a series of microgravity tests, paving the way for use on the international space station next year. Now, NASA has announced that it successfully tested its first rocket engine part ...

How to Lead a Team to Greatness, From the Man Who Sequenced the Human Genome

July 5, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow From sequencing the human genome to running the largest biomedical research agency in the world, Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, has a record of harnessing complex public institutions to get things done. In his five years as NIH Director, much of Collins’ agenda has centered ...

Infographic: See Every Manned Space Flight Since 1961

July 2, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow When people think of “bold” and “government” in the same sentence one program comes to mind for most Americans: the space program. Beginning with the Mercury Astronauts (the famous “Mercury Seven”), hitting its apex with the moon landings, and finding its stride with the shuttle program, no government initiative better ...

The Doctor Is In

July 1, 2013 I’m a little underslept today,” Dr. Francis Collins laughs, sitting in his office in the historic Building 1 of the National Institutes of Health’s sprawling campus in Bethesda, Md., where he presides as the dean of the nation’s health. They say Collins is indefatigable. He has accomplished so much in ...

The One Question The Best Federal Leaders Ask Themselves

June 21, 2013 Listen to the story: Download this episode | Subscribe on iTunes Shelly Metzenbaum, the Office of Management and Budget’s former Associate Director for Performance and Personnel Management, recently joined us on the Excellence in Government Podcast to reflect on her time with OMB and share what she’s seen separate high ...

We’ve Been Whining About ‘Modern’ Life for Over 100 Years

June 19, 2013 Do you think, thanks to technology, that modern life moves too fast? That email is too fast and frequent, overwhelming the senses and cheapening our correspondence? Or that we’ve forgotten how to relax (especially in cities) and that we spend too much “family time” staring into our own personal devices, ...