AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Marina Koren

Marina Koren Marina Koren is a staff correspondent at National Journal. Before joining, she covered science and history and managed social media for Smithsonian magazine. Her writing has previously appeared in Psychology Today, Popular Mechanics and The News Journal, Delaware's main daily newspaper. Marina graduated from the University of Delaware with degrees in English and psychology. She served as editor-in-chief of the independent student newspaper, The Review. Marina is from Verona, N.J.
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The CDC Just Raised Its Warning Level for U.S. Travel to Three African Countries

2:33 PM ET The risk that the Ebola virus, which doctors can't treat or cure, could reach the United States from West Africa is small. But American officials are starting to think it's better to be safe than sorry. On Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raised its warning level for ...

As Ebola Outbreak Spreads in West Africa, U.S. Scientists Look for Cure

July 30, 2014 There's a lot we don't know about the Ebola virus. The deadly virus likely comes from fruit bats, but scientists don't know for sure. They also don't know all the ways the highly contagious virus is transmitted, nor how the disease develops within infected people, almost 90 percent of whom ...

Obama Slaps New Sanctions on Russian Economy

July 29, 2014 This time last week, the Obama administration was sending not-so-subtle hints to Europe, persuading the continent's leaders to react to continued Russian aggression in Ukraine. On Tuesday, President Obama announced that he and the leaders of Britain, France, Germany, and Italy would impose sanctions on key sectors of the Russian ...

The Government Is Cracking Down on School Bake Sales

July 25, 2014 Barely a month after federal regulations for school cafeterias kicked in, states are already pushing back. Specifically, they're fighting nutrition standards that would considerably alter one of the most sacred rituals of the American public school system: bake sales. Twelve states have established their own policies to circumvent regulations in ...

How Can the U.S. Fix The Case Backlog of Black-Lung-Stricken Miners?

July 24, 2014 For Robert Bailey Jr., breathing doesn't come naturally. At least not anymore. After 36 years as a union coal miner, Bailey suffers from pneumoconiosis, commonly known as black-lung disease, a respiratory illness caused by prolonged exposure to coal dust. "Living with black lung is thinking about every breath you take," ...

U.S. Says Russia 'Created the Conditions' for Malaysia Airlines Crash

July 23, 2014 On Monday, President Obama wondered aloud what pro-Russian separatists were "trying to hide" following the downing of a civilian jetliner in eastern Ukraine. On Tuesday, U.S. intelligence officials said it was their responsibility for the crash, which killed all 298 people on board. The new intel concluded that separatists likely ...

U.S. Officials: Russia 'Created the Conditions' for Malaysia Airlines Crash

July 23, 2014 On Monday, President Obama wondered aloud what pro-Russian separatists were "trying to hide" following the downing of a civilian jetliner in eastern Ukraine. On Tuesday, U.S. intelligence officials said it was their responsibility for the crash, which killed all 298 people on board. The new intel concluded that separatists likely ...

Ukraine Says Malaysia Airlines Crash Is No Different Than 9/11

July 21, 2014 The Ukrainian president says he sees no difference between the downing of a civilian jetliner over Ukraine last week and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, calling the pro-Russian separatists he believes to be responsible for the crash "terrorists." "I don't see any differences from the tragedy 9/11, from the tragedy ...

Is the U.S. Ready to Patrol the Arctic?

July 13, 2014 The U.S. Coast Guard is facing a dilemma at the North Pole. The service's fleet of icebreakers, ships designed to navigate and cut through ice-covered waters in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, is getting older. The vessels themselves are slowly deteriorating, and by 2020, naval experts say the country's icebreaking ...

What Happened to America's Most Important Arctic Ships?

July 11, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The U.S. Coast Guard is facing a dilemma at the North Pole. The service's fleet of icebreakers, ships designed to navigate and cut through ice-covered waters in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, is getting older. The vessels themselves are slowly deteriorating, and by 2020, naval experts say the country's icebreaking ...