AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Leo Mirani

Leo Mirani is a reporter for Quartz in London. He has previously worked at The Economist, Time Out Mumbai and Tehelka.
Results 21-30 of 83

Here’s How Google Search Will Change After a 3-Year Battle With European Regulators

February 5, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow It’s finally over. After three years of back and forth, the European Commission announced an agreement with Google Wednesday morning that will govern the placement of competitors’ ads on Google’s search services. The Commission opened an investigation in Nov. 2010 after Google’s rivals claimed the search engine demoted their sites ...

Calvinklein.clothing, Soccer.guru, and Brownpeople.singles—This Is What the New Web Looks Like

February 3, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow If you had typed calvinklein.clothing into your browser’s address bar last week, you would have reached an error page or a list of Google search results. Do it today, and your browser will redirect you to Calvin Klein’s official website, calvinklein.com. The new world wide web is upon us. Last ...

This Company Says Its Software Could Have Prevented Snowden’s NSA Leaks

January 31, 2014 Government servants are hardly the best paid employees in the world, even if they are spies. But the older ones do have pensions of the sort most young people could never imagine. So why would a 30-year veteran of Britain’s secret service, with a “gold-plated” pension to look forward to, ...

This Company Says Its Technology Could Have Detected Snowden’s Intrusions

January 31, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Government servants are hardly the best paid employees in the world, even if they are spies. But the older ones do have pensions of the sort most young people could never imagine. So why would a 30-year veteran of Britain’s secret service, with a “gold-plated” pension to look forward to, ...

Why Free Games Are Increasingly the Most Profitable Apps

January 30, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow With the possible exception of Pou, every one of the 10 most downloaded apps worldwide, when you include downloads on both Apple and Android devices, is a game. (Pou is a virtual pet, which is not strictly a game, but it’s also not not a game, depending on how you ...

A Billion Smartphones Were Shipped in 2013—and That’s Not Even the Interesting Part

January 28, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In 2013, the world’s phone manufacturers shipped (as opposed to sold) just over a billion smartphones according to IDC. Strategy Analytics, a competing research firm, puts the number for smartphones slightly lower at 990 million. Either way, what’s interesting isn’t the nice round ten-digit number—it’s the suggestion that the big ...

Why Google Wants to Give You 101 Alternatives to .Com

January 23, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Hundreds of new top-level domain names (the last bit of a web address, like .com) will hit the web this year. Of nearly 2,000 proposed domains, 101 belong to Google, one of the largest single applicants. That’s odd, for Google has worked hard to make domain names as irrelevant as ...

The Biggest Land Rush in the History of the Internet Starts on February 4

January 22, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Web is about to have its big bang. About 1,000 new generic top-level domain names, or gTLDs (the last bit of an internet address, such as the com in qz.com or Nextov.com) will come into existence this year. On Feb. 4, anybody will be able to create and start ...

Why Facebook Just Agreed to Give Data to Russia’s Biggest Search Engine

January 14, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Russia and the former Soviet states at its periphery have remained steadfastly immune to the charms of Facebook. The American social network figures nowhere in a list of top 10 websites by the number of unique users in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus or the Central Asian ‘Stans. Instead, Russians and their ...

Even in the Cloud, Japan and China Are at Odds

December 27, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Shinzo Abe isn’t the only one stirring up Japanese-Chinese tensions. Japan’s National Information Security Center has asked government ministries to wean themselves off foreign-made typing apps that make it easy to use English-language keyboard to input Japanese characters. These apps are made by Microsoft, Google, and China’s Baidu. The NISC’s ...