AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Leo Mirani

Leo Mirani is a reporter for Quartz in London. He has previously worked at The Economist, Time Out Mumbai and Tehelka.
Results 21-30 of 92

Why Nobody Can Tell Whether the World’s Biggest Quantum Computer Is a Quantum Computer

April 15, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For the past several years, a Canadian company called D-Wave Systems has been selling what it says is the largest quantum computer ever built. D-Wave’s clients include Lockheed Martin, NASA, the US National Security Agency, and Google, each of which paid somewhere between $10 million and $15 million for the ...

Turkey's Increasingly Troubling Efforts to Control the Internet

March 31, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Over the weekend, Google reported that Turkey had intercepted traffic to its public domain name system (DNS) service—part of prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly draconian crackdown against the social media networks that are being used to distribute damaging information about him. To understand why the DNS interception is so ...

Afghanistan’s Rising Export Is Not Opium – It’s Telecoms

March 27, 2014 The largest mobile network operator in Afghanistan is not a multinational company. Or it wasn’t until this month, when Roshan Telecom took its network to Uganda, Burundi and Tanzania. That makes telecoms Afghanistan’s most high-profile export after opium. Roshan Telecom was born in Kabul in July 2003. Its headquarters remain ...

These Companies Are Mining the World’s Data by Selling Street Lights and Farm Drones

March 25, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Few tech bigwigs get excited about disrupting nitty-gritty municipal markets like street lighting. Even fewer have ever set foot on an actual farm, much less thought of technology designed for one. But the boring world of basic needs and utilities hides huge opportunity for tech’s favourite revenue source: data. At ...

Commentary: I Spent a Week Using Only Mobile Internet, and So Should You

March 17, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow I spent the past week tethering my computer to the mobile internet connection on my phone. It was awful. I wholeheartedly recommend it. It took people in rich countries several years to crawl from achingly slow dial-up connections (remember those?) to ISDN lines, to true broadband. It is by now ...

Here’s What the Future of Car Navigation Looks Like

March 12, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In 1946, Jorge Luis Borges wrote “On Exactitude in Science,” a very short story about an empire so obsessed with cartography that it eventually built a map as vast as the territory “which coincided point for point with it.” That vision is now coming close to being reality. “Bona fide ...

Yahoo Has Joined the War for Your Online Identity—About Half a Decade Too Late

March 5, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For nearly half a decade, Yahoo has been giving away its most valuable asset to its rivals. Now it has decided that that must stop. About 800 million people use one or more of Yahoo’s services every month. Some of those many millions log into Yahoo with their Google or ...

Russia’s Cyberwar Against Ukraine Is Every Bit as Strategic as its Ground Offensive

March 4, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The head of Ukraine’s security service says that the mobile phones of Ukrainian lawmakers are under attack by equipment located in Russian-controlled Crimea. That’s not terribly surprising, but the limited scope of the attack is. In the past—Estonia in 2007, Georgia in 2008—Russian cyber attacks have taken the form of ...

It Turns Out People Are Better at Protecting Their Privacy Than Companies Would Like

February 7, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The struggle between Facebook, Google and their users has led to an unexpected result, contends a new book on privacy: Every time social networks force openness on their users, people become much more guarded in what they share, leading internet giants to push for yet more openness. This is the ...

Here’s How Google Search Will Change After a 3-Year Battle With European Regulators

February 5, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow It’s finally over. After three years of back and forth, the European Commission announced an agreement with Google Wednesday morning that will govern the placement of competitors’ ads on Google’s search services. The Commission opened an investigation in Nov. 2010 after Google’s rivals claimed the search engine demoted their sites ...