AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Leo Mirani

Leo Mirani is a reporter for Quartz in London. He has previously worked at The Economist, Time Out Mumbai and Tehelka.
Results 11-20 of 87

A Tiny Technical Change in iOS 8 Could Stop Marketers Spying on You

June 9, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Whenever you walk around a major Western city with your phone’s Wi-Fi turned on, you are broadcasting your location to government agencies, marketing companies and location analytics firms. In shopping malls, for instance, a firm called Euclid Analytics collects, in its own words, “the presence of the device, its signal ...

The Future of Mobile Phones Doesn’t Include Phone Calls

June 4, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The idea of using a mobile phone to actually talk to people already seems quaint to many young people. According to data presented in Ericsson’s latest Mobility Report (pdf), a biannual study of how the world uses phones, mobile phones will be used less and less for calls, and more ...

What Exactly Those Data Brokers Know About You

May 27, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow You probably assume Google and Facebook know everything about you. You may not have heard of a group of companies who possibly know even more. They’re called data brokers, and their business is collecting and selling personal data—typically without your knowledge or consent—that are used to verify identity, help marketers, ...

Connected Cars Face One Big Problem: Staying Connected

May 21, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Connected cars promise to make driving easier, safer, and more fun. In the future, say proponents, drivers will be able to navigate with heads-up displays on their windshields, interact with their automobiles without having to mess about with knobs or touchpads, and stream music and download apps directly to the ...

What Somalia’s New Internet Looks Like From Silicon Valley

April 18, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Somalia’s first terrestrial fiber optic cables have connected the country to the modern internet. The BBC reported that Somalis have been in “culture shock” ever since. “They’re very excited about the speed,” a spokesman from Somalia Wireless, an internet service provider (ISP), told the BBC, which reports that: People have ...

Why Nobody Can Tell Whether the World’s Biggest Quantum Computer Is a Quantum Computer

April 15, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For the past several years, a Canadian company called D-Wave Systems has been selling what it says is the largest quantum computer ever built. D-Wave’s clients include Lockheed Martin, NASA, the US National Security Agency, and Google, each of which paid somewhere between $10 million and $15 million for the ...

Turkey's Increasingly Troubling Efforts to Control the Internet

March 31, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Over the weekend, Google reported that Turkey had intercepted traffic to its public domain name system (DNS) service—part of prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly draconian crackdown against the social media networks that are being used to distribute damaging information about him. To understand why the DNS interception is so ...

Afghanistan’s Rising Export Is Not Opium – It’s Telecoms

March 27, 2014 The largest mobile network operator in Afghanistan is not a multinational company. Or it wasn’t until this month, when Roshan Telecom took its network to Uganda, Burundi and Tanzania. That makes telecoms Afghanistan’s most high-profile export after opium. Roshan Telecom was born in Kabul in July 2003. Its headquarters remain ...

These Companies Are Mining the World’s Data by Selling Street Lights and Farm Drones

March 25, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Few tech bigwigs get excited about disrupting nitty-gritty municipal markets like street lighting. Even fewer have ever set foot on an actual farm, much less thought of technology designed for one. But the boring world of basic needs and utilities hides huge opportunity for tech’s favourite revenue source: data. At ...

Commentary: I Spent a Week Using Only Mobile Internet, and So Should You

March 17, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow I spent the past week tethering my computer to the mobile internet connection on my phone. It was awful. I wholeheartedly recommend it. It took people in rich countries several years to crawl from achingly slow dial-up connections (remember those?) to ISDN lines, to true broadband. It is by now ...