AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Kellie Lunney

Senior Correspondent Kellie Lunney covers federal pay and benefits issues, the budget process and financial management. After starting her career in journalism at Government Executive in 2000, she returned in 2008 after four years at sister publication National Journal writing profiles of influential Washingtonians. In 2006, she received a fellowship at the Ohio State University through the Kiplinger Public Affairs in Journalism program, where she worked on a project that looked at rebuilding affordable housing in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. She has appeared on C-SPAN’s Washington Journal, NPR and Feature Story News, where she participated in a weekly radio roundtable on the 2008 presidential campaign. In the late 1990s, she worked at the Housing and Urban Development Department as a career employee. She is a graduate of Colgate University.
Results 1241-1250 of 1554

Pentagon needs to clear up confusion about housing allowances, report says

April 19, 2001 Base commanders need more information on how the Pentagon sets annual housing allowance rates in order to dispute allegations of unfairness by service members, according to a new General Accounting Office report. In January 2000, the Defense Department changed the way it calculated housing allowance rates, resulting in significant rate ...

Audit: INS can't account for missing weapons, computers

April 19, 2001 A recent audit by the Justice Department's inspector general revealed thousands of computers are unaccounted for and hundreds of weapons are missing from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The audit, which investigated the agency's record-keeping over the past three years, said that 61,000 items worth nearly $70 million were missing ...

Energy Secretary denounces racial profiling

April 17, 2001 Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham issued a memo to employees Monday denouncing discrimination at the department. An Energy official confirmed the memo had been issued, but said the department would not publicly release the document because it was an internal memo for employees only. In the memo, Abraham said discrimination would ...

Oversight board criticizes proposed IRS budget

April 16, 2001 The Bush administration's proposed budget for the Internal Revenue Service does not provide enough money to modernize technology, according to the IRS Oversight Board. In an interim report released by the oversight board Thursday, the group recommended an 8.9 percent increase over the administration's proposed figure of $9.4 billion for ...

Agencies turn in telecommuting reports

April 16, 2001 Reports outlining how federal agencies will promote telecommuting to their employees are due to the Office of Personnel Management Monday. In a Feb. 9 memo to department and agency heads, OPM Acting Director Stephen Cohen instructed agencies to identify positions that lend themselves to telecommuting and offer employees in those ...

Reconstructing an Image

April 15, 2001 The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to recover from a year of bad publicity. he Army Corps of Engineers is working to rebuild its image after a year of bad press and criticism. Last November, the Army inspector general found that three top Army Corps of Engineers officials had ...

Making the Case

April 15, 2001 By matching performance to dollars, the Coast Guard has won increased funding, but its responsibilities still outpace its budget. n Dec. 17, a 600-foot cruise ship collided with a ferocious winter storm off the Virginia coast. The vessel, carrying 34 crewmembers, was on its way to Charleston, S.C., when the ...

Proposed cut in contraceptive coverage may not affect feds

April 13, 2001 The Bush administration's proposal to end a requirement that health insurance firms offer birth control coverage to federal employees probably won't have a significant impact, federal officials say. In President Bush's 2002 budget released Monday, he proposed scrapping a law that requires insurance coverage for a broad range of contraceptives ...

Interior Secretary could be held in contempt

April 13, 2001 Interior Secretary Gale Norton may face contempt of court charges for failing to comply with a federal court order in a four-year-old lawsuit involving the Bureau of Indian Affairs' management of individual trust funds for Native Americans. A group of Native Americans filed a motion Monday with U.S. District Court ...

Student loan repayment benefit takes effect

April 12, 2001 After 11 years and several delays, a student loan repayment benefit for federal employees finally took effect Thursday. In February, Office of Personnel Management officials announced in the Federal Register that the effective date for the student loan regulation would be delayed from Feb. 12 until April 12 to give ...