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Kellie Lunney

Senior Correspondent Kellie Lunney covers federal pay and benefits issues, the budget process and financial management. After starting her career in journalism at Government Executive in 2000, she returned in 2008 after four years at sister publication National Journal writing profiles of influential Washingtonians. In 2006, she received a fellowship at the Ohio State University through the Kiplinger Public Affairs in Journalism program, where she worked on a project that looked at rebuilding affordable housing in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. She has appeared on C-SPAN’s Washington Journal, NPR and Feature Story News, where she participated in a weekly radio roundtable on the 2008 presidential campaign. In the late 1990s, she worked at the Housing and Urban Development Department as a career employee. She is a graduate of Colgate University.
Results 1111-1120 of 1650

Bank of America delays cancellation of Army travel cards

March 25, 2002 Bank of America has delayed its decision to cancel travel credit cards issued to more than 400,000 Army Department employees, according to government and bank officials. Earlier this month, Bank of America threatened to cancel its account with the Army by midnight on March 25 because of the agency's millions ...

Pay, relocation costs deter potential appointees

March 22, 2002 The salaries of top political appointees have dropped more than 30 percent in inflation-adjusted terms since 1969, and federal relocation benefits offer people few incentives to work in Washington, according to two new reports. Political appointees' salaries have climbed more slowly than middle-income salaries in the private sector over the ...

INS chief pledges to speed up management reforms

March 19, 2002 The head of the Immigration and Naturalization Service said Tuesday that the agency will move faster on much-needed management reforms after last week's discovery that a contractor sent a flight school copies of visa approvals for two terrorists involved in the Sept. 11 attacks. The flight school received the letters ...

GAO chief criticizes competitive sourcing quotas

March 18, 2002 The head of the General Accounting Office criticized the use of quotas in competitive sourcing during a Senate hearing Monday. "In my personal opinion, it is inappropriate to have quantitative targets in the area of competitive sourcing," said GAO chief David Walker at a hearing on legislation that would give ...

Improving access for non-English speakers is costly, report says

March 18, 2002 Improving access to government programs for people who aren't proficient in English could cost the government more than $1 billion, according to a new report from the Office of Management and Budget. In a report to Congress, OMB said that the cost of improving assistance to people with limited English ...

GSA suspends Enron and Andersen from new business

March 15, 2002 The General Services Administration Friday temporarily suspended Enron Corp. and the auditing firm Arthur Andersen from doing future business with the federal government. GSA suspended Enron for one year from receiving government contracts, while Andersen's suspension lasts for the duration of its criminal indictment. The agency announced its decision a ...

Bush orders broad review of INS operations

March 14, 2002 President Bush has ordered a sweeping review of the Immigration and Naturalization Service after a Florida flight school received copies of visa approvals for two terrorists involved in the Sept. 11 attacks. Bush directed the Justice Department's inspector general to investigate record-keeping and mailing procedures at the INS to discover ...

Poor oversight, lax attitudes fuel Navy purchase card fraud

March 13, 2002 Witnesses at a House hearing Wednesday blamed poor oversight and lax accountability for the widespread abuse of government purchase cards at two Navy units. Despite the Navy's efforts over the past year to reduce purchase card fraud, some employees and managers at two San Diego-based naval units continue to justify ...

Ridge unveils more specific national alert system

March 12, 2002 The White House Office of Homeland Security on Tuesday announced a new warning system that includes five levels of alert for assessing the threat of possible terrorist attacks. The color-coded alert system, created by a presidential directive, is designed to help government and law enforcement officials properly gauge threats of ...

Lawmakers choose words carefully when describing feds, study finds

March 11, 2002 Members of the House of Representatives in the 103rd and 104th Congresses, particularly Republicans, often used the term "bureaucrat" pejoratively to influence the debate over the size and role of government, according to a new study by a think tank scholar. "If pejorative terms about government are used in floor ...