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Kaveh Waddell

Kaveh Waddell Kaveh Waddell is a staff correspondent for National Journal, where he previously conducted policy research​. A native of Seattle, he studied international politics and economics at Middlebury College
Results 1-10 of 42

FBI Accuses Two in Minnesota of Trying To Join ISIS

November 26, 2014 An 18-year-old Minnesotan who is accused of conspiracy to provide material support to the Islamic State group was arrested on Tuesday following an FBI investigation. His friend, a Minnesotan two years his senior, is charged with actually providing that support. He is believed to have joined a terrorist organization in ...

FBI Accuses Two Young Minnesotans of Planning to Join Extremists in Syria

November 25, 2014 n 18-year-old Minnesotan who is accused of conspiracy to provide material support to the Islamic State group was arrested on Tuesday following an FBI investigation. His friend, a Minnesotan two years his senior, is charged with actually providing that support. He is believed to have joined a terrorist organization in ...

A Resurgent GOP Is Fuming Over Extending the Iran Nuclear Talks

November 25, 2014 Some U.S. politicians are less than thrilled about Secretary of State John Kerry's Monday announcement that nuclear negotiations with Iran will be extended until June. Almost immediately after Kerry's announcement, lawmakers critical of a nuclear deal with Iran began communicating their doubts about the extension, which is not the first. ...

Justice Department Wants Better 'Police-Community Relations' Ahead of Ferguson Decision

November 21, 2014 The Justice Department has created a list of its existing guidelines for law enforcement ahead of a major decision in Ferguson, Mo., that officials believe could result in protests. Attorney General Eric Holder says in a Friday video that his department has compiled its rules for "strong police-community relations" into ...

Is This Activist Sheriff the New Face of Border Hawks?

November 19, 2014 Speaking in uniform with his hands folded on a desk, Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones became the latest in a line of sheriffs who are speaking out on what they consider a broken immigration system. Jones speaks directly to President Obama in a video message posted to YouTube on Tuesday, ...

Sen. Chris Murphy Wants to Confirm Loretta Lynch Before January

November 10, 2014 Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., wants to confirm Loretta Lynch, President Obama's nominee for attorney general, before January, when Republicans will retake control of the Senate. "I've not spoken to Senator [Harry] Reid about his intentions, but I would like to see us move forward," Murphy said Sunday on CNN's State ...

When Liberal Causes Don't Stand a Chance in Washington, Activists Go Local

November 10, 2014 he same day that brought a slew of new Republican lawmakers into both houses of Congress also saw a host of liberal measures pass in the very states that were voting for GOP candidates. Successful ballot measures legalized marijuana in Oregon and the District of Columbia,raised the minimum wage in ...

Louisiana Residents' Constitutional Right to Trick-or-Treat Is Under Threat

October 31, 2014 Civil-rights advocates are stepping up to protect Louisiana residents' constitutional trick-or-treating rights. Many Louisiana communities have recommended hours during the evening for trick-or-treating, and the American Civil Liberties Union says some areas will even impose penalties on trick-or-treating outside the official window. In an open letter addressed to every sheriff ...

John Kerry: The Cold War Was 'Easy' Compared to Today

October 30, 2014 Today's global political landscape makes the Cold War look simple, according to John Kerry. "The Cold War was easy compared to where we are today," the secretary of State said Thursday, during an appearance at The Atlantic's Washington Ideas Forum, an annual event that features high-profile speakers in government and ...

Climate Change Worries Drive South Florida 51st State Plan

October 23, 2014 When a region wants to break away from its state or from the U.S.—whether we're talking about Texas, Vermont, or the former Confederate states—it's usually because of government, politics, and money. But for the city of South Miami, which earlier this month passed a resolution to separate southern from northern ...