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Kaveh Waddell

Kaveh Waddell Kaveh Waddell is an associate editor at The Atlantic.
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Police Can Force You to Use Your Fingerprint to Unlock Your Phone

May 3, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow When Apple announced in 2013 that its next iPhone would include a fingerprint reader, it touted the feature as a leap forward in security. Many people don’t set up a passcode on their phones, Apple SVP Phil Schiller said at the keynote event where the Touch ID sensor was unveiled,...

Don’t Panic (For Now) About ISIS Hacking

April 28, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In the nearly two years since ISIS declared itself a caliphate, the group has leaned heavily on technology to recruit, communicate and attack foreign targets—each with varying degrees of success. Twitter and Facebook have scrambled to head off ISIS recruiters who spread propaganda on their platforms, and top intelligence officials...

The FBI’s Growing List of Cybercriminals

April 27, 2016 For more than 60 years, the FBI has kept a list of its top ten most wanted fugitives. The idea took root in the bureau when a reporter asked the FBI in 1949 for a list of the “toughest guys” it was looking for, and published the list in theWashington...

The FBI’s Most-Wanted Cybercrooks

April 27, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For more than 60 years, the FBI has kept a list of its top 10 most-wanted fugitives. The idea took root in the bureau when a reporter asked the FBI in 1949 for a list of the “toughest guys” it was looking for, and published the list in the Washington...

How License-Plate Readers Have Helped Police and Lenders Target the Poor

April 23, 2016 Maybe you’ve seen them attached to the trunks of police cruisers: cameras, mounted in twos or threes, pointed down at an odd angle as if at the feet of passersby. But they’re not checking out your shoes—when switched on, they’re reading the license plates of every vehicle, parked or moving,...

The Dark Side of Big Data

April 8, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Big data can help solve problems that are too big for one person to wrap their head around. It’s helped businesses cut costs, cities plan new developments, intelligence agencies discover connections between terrorists, health officials predict outbreaks, and police forces get ahead of crime. Decision-makers are increasingly told to “listen...

Survey: People Will Share their Data with Companies for Cash

April 1, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In the smart home of the (not-so-distant) future, sensors will record and process occupants’ every coming and going. Opened the fridge at 3 a.m.? Noted. Washing machine hasn’t run in weeks? Your house knows. Daily habits, mealtimes, bedtime? All on file. That’s a lot of information, and the majority of...

Trump’s Plan for Cyberwar

March 31, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In a meandering, 100-minute-long telephone interview with The New York Times last week, Donald Trump elaborated on some of the bold and belligerent foreign-policy prescriptions he’s hinted at in the past. He touched on nuclear weapons, spying and the fight against ISIS, bringing his tried-and-true “we’re losing” doom and gloom...

Smartphone Encryption is a Luxury

March 28, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Last year, a team of technology experts warned against giving law enforcement special access to encrypted communications. They explained that this special access would “undermine and reverse” the technology industry’s efforts to bolster digital security. The landmark paper addressed a conflict between technology companies and the government that had been...

7 Iranians Indicted for Hacking

March 25, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A New York grand jury has indicted seven Iranians for computer hacking, accusing them of coordinating a months-long cyberattack on New York financial institutions, according to documents unsealed Thursday. One of the Iranians was also indicted for illegally gaining access to some of the controls of a dam located less...