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Joseph Marks

Senior Correspondent Joseph Marks covers cybersecurity for Nextgov. He previously covered cybersecurity for Politico, intellectual property for Bloomberg BNA and federal litigation for Law360. He covered government technology for Nextgov during an earlier stint at the publication and began his career at Midwestern newspapers covering everything under the sun. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and a master’s in international affairs from Georgetown University.
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We Should Be Getting More From IT Project Reviews, Report Says

June 13, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A system of top-level, adapt-or-perish reviews hasn’t done enough to stem the tide of over-budget and past-deadline information technology projects across the government, according to a report published Thursday. The White House’s Office of Management and Budget also hasn’t done enough to verify the $4 billion it claims TechStat sessions...

NSA Might Not be Reading Your Tweets, But Sen. Mikulski Is

June 12, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Among online networking giants, Twitter alone appears to have not cooperated with a National Security Agency program known as Prism that mined some Americans’ online data. Twitter found its way into the Prism discussion on Wednesday, though, when Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., read a reporter’s tweet out loud during an...

China Thwarts Its Citizens’ Access to White House Petition

June 12, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow People who post petitions to the White House website We the People often complain the government isn’t really paying attention to their grievances; another group, however, seems to be paying very close attention: the Chinese government. On May 5, someone in Miami posted a We the People petition asking the...

Think That Government Prize Contest Was Fixed? Take It To Court.

June 12, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Government Accountability Office has no jurisdiction over disputes that arise from prize competitions and challenges run by federal agencies, the office said in a decision Friday. This is the first time GAO’s procurement law division has been asked to render an opinion on a government contest, Ralph White, the...

Agencies Aren't Honest About Tech Spending and Risks, Auditor Says

June 11, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Better information technology management could save taxpayers $10 billion within five years, the government's top technology auditor told lawmakers Tuesday. But getting there will require agencies to be more open about what they're spending on IT and what they're actually getting for that investment. David Powner, director of Information Technology...

IT Reform Act Could Hitch a Ride on Major Defense Bill

June 11, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The bipartisan team sponsoring a complete reboot of how the government buys information technology introduced a version of its bill as an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act on Tuesday. Packaging separate legislation inside a major policy bill such as the Defense Authorization Act can speed passage because lawmakers...

Petition to Pardon NSA Leaker is Among Most Popular Ever Posted to White House Site

June 10, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow This story has been udpated. A petition on the White House’s We the People website demanding that President Obama pardon Edward Snowden, the leaker of National Security Agency documents, is gaining signatures at a rate that rivals and may surpass the most popular petitions ever posted to the site. More...

Commerce Seeks Unified Customer Management System

June 10, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Commerce Department is considering purchasing a single, cloud-based customer relations management system that it can use across its 12 agencies, solicitation documents show. The unified system would replace a hodgepodge of existing software tools that manage and track Commerce agencies’ marketing campaigns, surveys and Web and social media communications...

Moneyball Diplomacy

June 7, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow When violence spiked in Nigeria’s conflict-ridden Delta region in 2008, the government launched an amnesty program, offering to protect militants from prosecution and pay for their arms if they’d lay them down. It seemed like a reasonable approach and one that might work. But when the U.S. State Department’s Bureau...

Do We Need a Data Court?

June 7, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The complex information, security and privacy issues brought to the fore by recently exposed National Security Agency programs to mine telephone and Internet data might best be handled by a special “data court,” the Economist magazine’s Data Editor Kenneth Cukier said Friday. That’s because data, metadata and privacy issues can...