AUTHOR ARCHIVES

John Kamensky

Senior Fellow, IBM Center for the Business of Government John M. Kamensky is a Senior Research Fellow for the IBM Center for the Business of Government. He previously served as deputy director of Vice President Gore's National Partnership for Reinventing Government, a special assistant at the Office of Management and Budget, and as an assistant director at the Government Accountability Office. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and received a Masters in Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.
Results 171-174 of 174

How Do You Measure Performance You Can’t See?

October 30, 2012 Law enforcement has it tough when it comes time to measure their performance. Their effectiveness can’t be just measured on what is reported. After all, the goal of most law violators is to not be caught! So how can we measure what we can’t observe? Cracking the challenge of measuring...

The 7 Essentials of Cross-Agency Collaboration

October 24, 2012 How do you organize a cross-agency collaborative effort to get results no single agency could accomplish on its own? The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has developed an inventory of “mechanisms that the federal government uses to lead and implement interagency collaboration,” along with a self-assessment checklist to consider when using...

Next Steps Toward Better Results

August 1, 2001 ome innovations have a lengthy gestation period. In 1989, the British created a new type of agency called "Next Steps" agencies because they were the next step in the British government's reform process. In 1996, Vice President Al Gore created performance-based organizations based on the Next Steps model. And in...

A Soul Divided

September 1, 1996 ichael Hammer's vision of the soul of new organizations offers an unsettling version of the future federal workplace. As a result of presidential and congressional commitments to a balanced budget, domestic agencies face a 25 percent cut in spending over the next five years. Consequently, security is no longer a...