AUTHOR ARCHIVES

James Kitfield

James Kitfield James Kitfield a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency & Congress and a Defense One contributor. He is a former senior correspondent for National Journal and has written on defense, national security and foreign policy issues from Washington, D.C. for more than two decades.
Results 151-160 of 164

Perry's Principles

March 1, 1997 hen William J. Perry became secretary of Defense three years ago, few observers predicted a happy tenure at the Pentagon's helm. Perry was inheriting a military and defense industrial base reeling from the most profound drawdown in a generation. The post-Cold War era posed a host of difficult problems for ...

Biting the Bullet

January 1, 1997 or an organization struggling to maintain its equilibrium through a budgetary free fall, the news hit like an unexpected blast of turbulence. When the U.S. Army submitted its proposed fiscal 1997 budget earlier this year, Defense Secretary William J. Perry instructed the service to plan for an additional cut of ...

A Watchful Eye

December 1, 1996 s soldiers of the U.S. Army's 1st Armored Division were trudging through the mud of the Bosnian countryside dodging minefields in the last year, relatively few of them worried about the families they had left behind in Baumholder, Germany. They knew that their spouses and children were enjoying block parties ...

National Security: A Dramatic Makeover

November 16, 1996 erhaps not surprisingly, the calls began even before the debris was swept from the victory party. Secretary of State Christopher traveled to Little Rock, Ark., for a private meeting with Clinton the day after the election, one last errand after four years and nearly 700,000 miles of frequent flying. Defense ...

NATO's New Horizons

September 14, 1996 NATIONAL JOUNRAL, Vol. 28, No. 37 ot long after the end of a high-level meeting in Warsaw this summer, Robert E. Hunter, the U.S. ambassador to NATO, marveled at the historic changes taking place throughout the alliance. Quietly and with relatively little fanfare, NATO's senior ministers were engineering a dramatic ...

"They Still Need Us"

September 1, 1996 ational security advisers are perhaps the least visible, and yet among the most influential, players in Washington. While secretaries of State and Defense travel the world amidst huge staffs and press entourages, giving policy speeches and making headlines, national security advisers tend to work behind the scenes at the White ...

Growing Reliance on Simulation

August 15, 1996 he degree to which simulators and training systems have become embedded in nearly every aspect of military operations and doctrine became clear before the first ground troops ever boarded an aircraft for the recent mission to Bosnia-Herzegovina. Last summer, pilots rehearsed bombing strikes on a Powerscene computer simulation system, before ...

Battle Royal Over Missile Defense

August 15, 1996 ver since resurgent congressional Republicans pledged to resurrect Ronald Reagan's anti-missile shield for the United States as part of their "Contract with America," the issue has been at the center of a contentious tug-of-war between the Clinton Administration and Congress. The debate over when and how to deploy a national ...

Technology Sharpens Battlefield Awareness

August 15, 1996 n early preview of a future in which the U.S. military hopes to dominate the realm of "battlefield awareness" is on display in Bosnia. By applying a host of information age advances in command and control, communications, advanced sensors and computers, the military has constructed a picture of the former ...

Soaring Technology, Dwindling Budgets

August 15, 1996 onsensus is building among defense experts and Pentagon leaders that the military is at the threshold of a technological revolution. Technologies such as satellite communications, advanced sensors, remotely piloted drones, high-speed computers and advanced simulators have propelled the armed services to the brink of achieving a dominant advantage in awareness ...