AUTHOR ARCHIVES

James Kitfield

James Kitfield James Kitfield a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency & Congress and a Defense One contributor. He is a former senior correspondent for National Journal and has written on defense, national security and foreign policy issues from Washington, D.C. for more than two decades.
Results 131-140 of 174

NATO's New Mission

April 1, 1999 tour of U.S. troops on far-flung deployments to Europe last year revealed a North Atlantic Treaty Organization stretched to the point where it no longer resembles the defensive alliance that won the Cold War a decade ago. In Lithuania, near the Russian border, U.S. forces gathered with 5,000 other NATO ...

The Hollow Force Myth

January 1, 1999 jkitfield@njdc.com hen the Joint Chiefs of Staff testified before Congress last September, saying that the U.S. military faced a readiness crisis, the nation's senior military leaders provoked a storm of controversy and recriminations. How could America's all-volunteer force--once believed to be perhaps the finest military force the United States had ...

Services seek to improve joint operations

December 16, 1998 NORFOLK, Va.-This year the Pentagon conducted military exercises here to determine how the Information Revolution will affect the ability of the four armed services to fight together, or "jointly." The results were disquieting. Members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines, fed up with their often-incompatible communications systems, in ...

Readiness myths

December 14, 1998 Myth #1: It's a Readiness Crisis No, it's a modernization crisis. During the late 1980s and early '90s, the Pentagon lived beyond its means, essentially by making deep cuts in its annual weapons-buying accounts (weapons spending has decreased by more than 66 percent since 1986) and by making do with ...

The myth of the hollow force

December 14, 1998 As they walked into the Hart Senate Office Building on Sept. 29 for one of the most anticipated national security hearings of recent years, the Joint Chiefs of Staff carried a message that officers of their generation had hoped never to deliver. All five men, survivors of the Vietnam War ...

Into and out of the breach with Iraq, again

November 17, 1998 Once more (it's beginning to seem like evermore) into and out of the breach with Saddam Hussein. And once more, the questions in Washington have been much the same. Would the United States strike, or would Saddam's cheat be met with another American retreat? And if we struck, what then? ...

Hot Spot

November 1, 1998 jkitfield@njdc.com nside the Navy's new, windowless headquarters building for its forces in the Mediterranean, dots on an electronic map pinpoint ongoing operations and potential flashpoints. Sitting in Naples, Italy, just beyond the shadow of Mount Vesuvius and within range of Libya's Al Fatah missiles and MiG-29 aircraft, this underground command-and-control ...

In Bosnia, troops face long, hard slog

September 8, 1998 ZVORNIK, Bosnia-Herzegovina-For Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Steven Holliday and other peacekeepers in the traumatized land of Bosnia, homely signs of normalcy-a well-tended vegetable garden, the silhouette of houses unmarred by shell craters, city lights-carry geopolitical significance. "To me, the best barometers are children and old people. If they're waving, then ...

Agencies to spend billions on security upgrades

August 20, 1998 Buildings reduced to crumbled concrete; debris and carnage scattered over city blocks. These scenes from last week's terrorist attacks in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam were a terrifying replay of bombings in cities as disparate as New York, Dhahran, Oklahoma City and Buenos Aires. In all of those cities, the ...

The End of Merger Mania

August 15, 1998 jkitfield@njdc.com hroughout the post-Cold War era, the operative metaphor for a rapidly shrinking defense industrial base has been an event since dubbed "the Last Supper." At that infamous 1993 dinner, Pentagon officials informed the assembled leaders of America's premier defense and aerospace companies that fewer than half would survive the ...