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Eric Katz

Staff Correspondent Eric Katz joined Government Executive in the summer of 2012 after graduating from The George Washington University, where he studied journalism and political science. He has written for his college newspaper and an online political news website and worked in a public affairs office for the Navy’s Military Sealift Command. Most recently, he worked for Financial Times, where he reported on national politics.
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Social Security Doles Out More Than $500K to Sexual Predators

April 9, 2015 The Social Security Administration has paid more than $500,000 in benefits to sexual predators in recent years, according to a new report. In 1999, a new law was enacted that prevented SSA from providing any benefits to individuals held in institutions as “sexually dangerous persons.” The agency’s inspector general found ...

Compensation for Cyber-Breach Victims, Parking Perks for 'Special' Feds and More

April 8, 2015 It’s never a good thing to have your private information stolen by miscreants potentially looking to exploit the data. But for employees of the U.S. Postal Service, a widespread breach in fall 2014 came with a small perk: USPS management agreed to pay for one year of free credit monitoring ...

What a Rand Paul Presidency Would Mean for Federal Employees

April 7, 2015 Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., announced his candidacy for president on Tuesday with a resounding criticism of the federal government and its employees. Paul, known as a Republican with libertarian leanings, spoke of the distrust he and Americans have for their government and the need to restrain it. In his speech ...

How Reality-Altering Glasses Could Save the Postal Service Millions

April 6, 2015 In recent years, U.S. Postal Service management and lawmakers have spoken of the need to make changes that “reflect the reality” of a world in which the demand to send mail has diminished. To the USPS inspector general, however, reality could be the very dimension holding the agency back from ...

DHS Chief Promises Improvements After Show Blasts ‘Dysfunctional’ Department

April 6, 2015 The Homeland Security Department is a bloated bureaucracy, too large and disparate to effectively manage as one entity. Such was the takeaway from a report on 60 Minutes, the famed news magazine program on CBS. The report focused on a series of interviews with DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson, who defended ...

Workforce Cuts in House and Senate Budgets, in One Chart

April 3, 2015 In the coming weeks, lawmakers will come together -- or attempt to come together -- on a legislative blueprint with potential to drastically reshape the federal workforce. The House and Senate have each passed their own budget proposals, and neither option paints a particular pretty picture for federal employees. Both ...

Despite Upticks, VA Defends Improvements in Wait Times for Care

April 2, 2015 The Veterans Affairs Department defended its improvement and newfound transparency in vets’ wait times for care, while taking issue with media reports challenging senior officials’ public testimony. In a blog post Thursday, the Veterans Health Administration interim Undersecretary for Health Carolyn Clancy touted the agency’s initiative to publicly post wait ...

DHS Vows to Shield Mid-Level Employees From Congress

April 1, 2015 Homeland Security Department leadership has vowed to keep its mid-level employees out of the limelight and away from congressional inquiry, despite a lawmaker’s subpoena for two Secret Service agents to testify in the House. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, issued the subpoenas ...

Indiana Governor Uses Federal Statute to Defend Controversial Law

March 31, 2015 Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has come under fire in recent days for signing a law that critics say opens the door to discrimination against gays and lesbians in the state. Pence, a Republican, offered an interesting defense of the law in response to the public outcry the law has sparked: ...

Bureau of Prisons Wanted Whistleblower to Work from a Converted Jail Cell

March 31, 2015 When the Obama administration in recent years has discussed the federal office of the future, it never mentioned converting former jail cells into workspaces. A jail cell, however, is exactly where the Federal Bureau of Prisons planned to move a whistleblower after she reported malfeasance to the inspector general’s office. ...