AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Donald F. Kettl

Professor, University of Maryland School of Public Policy

Donald F. Kettl is a professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy and a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the Volcker Alliance. He is the author of many books, including Escaping Jurassic Government: How to Recover America's Lost Commitment to Competence, The Politics of the Administrative Process, System Under Stress and The Next Government of the United States. Kettl is a two-time recipient of the Louis Brownlow Book Award of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2008, he won the American Political Science’s John Gaus Award for a lifetime of exemplary scholarship in political science and public administration. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University and has held appointments at University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University, the University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Results 21-30 of 34

Why the Next President Must Make Government More Collaborative

February 2, 2016 When the next president moves into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, a host of big challenges will be waiting: ensuring good jobs, public safety, quality education, good health care, a clean environment, and a basic infrastructure that supports economic growth and a high quality of life. A quick look at the water...

Bright Ideas Department: 2016 Campaign Edition

October 16, 2015 Now that we’re hip deep in the 2016 campaign, a flurry of ideas for transforming — even eliminating — federal departments and programs have popped up. I’ll take a careful look from time to time at some of these proposals. High on the bright ideas list are: Eliminate the Internal...

Six Lessons From Katrina Loom Even Larger 10 Years Later

August 17, 2015 This column has been updated to include a link to The Geneva Papers. In December 2005, just three months after Katrina savaged the Gulf Coast, we edited On Risk and Disaster, a book on the key lessons that the storm so painfully taught. The book was very different from most...

Why Plugging the Cyber Breach Is the 2nd Biggest Problem at OPM

July 20, 2015 Beth Cobert has just walked into the toughest job in Washington. Tens of millions of federal employees and their families have had their personal information stolen. Members of Congress have called into question the competence of the Office of Personnel Management in allowing the cyber breach to happen -- or...

Why the War on the IRS Makes No Cents

June 30, 2015 The Internal Revenue Service appropriations bill has started its tortuous path through Congress—and it savages the agency’s funding. It provides 8 percent less than the current level and 22 percent less than the administration’s request. It’s less even than its budget 25 years ago when, as the Office of Management...

The Reluctant Executive

May 9, 2014 Measuring government’s performance has to be a key to budget savings, doesn’t it? Figure out what works and cut what doesn’t—for 20 years, that’s been the recurring theme of federal performance strategies. But the evidence is pretty clear: Performance management just isn’t a way to produce big budget savings, and...

Heading for Disaster

February 1, 2009 The dangers of building a new social contract between government and citizens by making it up as we go along. In a couple of weeks last September, the Federal Reserve and Treasury Department made more lightning- fast decisions, involving more government money, than at any time in the nation's history....

Fixing the Future

January 16, 2008 With a new administration taking office a year from now, it's time to peer ahead at its fundamental dilemma: It will face problems that can't be ignored, and it won't have enough tools to solve them. Some efforts will continue in some form-such as the Bush administration's performance management push....

Fixing the Future

January 1, 2008 The next president must be ready to take on inescapable management problems. With a new administration taking office a year from now, it's time to peer ahead at its fundamental dilemma: It will face problems that can't be ignored, and it won't have enough tools to solve them. Some efforts...

In Harm's Way

April 1, 2006 Government must act now to thwart the economic and human toll of the next disaster. New Orleanians are counting down the days to the start of hurricane season-June 1-the way merchants count the shopping days left before Christmas. In neither case is there a thinkable alternative to being ready. When...