AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Conor Friedersdorf

Conor Friedersdorf is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he focuses on politics and national affairs. He lives in Venice, California, and is the founding editor of The Best of Journalism, a newsletter devoted to exceptional nonfiction.
Results 51-60 of 86

King George's Revenge: Is Britain Using Our Tax Money to Spy on Us?

August 2, 2013 Weeks ago, I worried that surveillance officials in allied countries might conspire with one another to spy on one another's citizens. The NSA is restricted in the spying it can do on Americans. But it can spy on the British all it wants. And there's no law that prevents the ...

The Era of iSpying: Court Upholds Warrantless Cell-Phone Tracking

July 31, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow As ever, rumors are circulating about the features Apple may include on the next iteration of the iPhone. Will it store fingerprints as a security feature used to unlock the device or aid secure transactions? That's the buzz. The idea has undoubted appeal. I'd love to press my thumb to ...

Local Anti-Drone Activism Begins: 'If They Fly in Town, We Will Shoot Them Down'

July 30, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Charles Krauthammer once predicted that the first American to shoot down a domestic drone would be a folk hero. Phillip Steele, a resident of Deer Trail, Colorado, wants to enable that hero. As the FAA loosens regulations on domestic drone use, Steele has submitted an ordinance to his town's board ...

Senate Majority Whip: FISA Court Is 'Fixed' and 'Loaded'

July 29, 2013 The Obama Administration says the FISA court adequately safeguards Americans' civil liberties. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, who holds the second-highest Democratic leadership position in the Senate, disagrees. "These FISA courts -- there should be a real court proceeding," he said on Sunday. "In this case, it's fixed in a ...

Commentary: On Spying, Obama Just Isn't That Into the Democratic Coalition

July 25, 2013 "People who understand how representative government works," Matt Yglesias recently argued, "are going to remain fundamentally comfortable with our basic partisan commitments and there's nothing even a little bit hypocritical about it." Is he correct? I don't believe that partisan commitments are hypocritical or that Yglesias is a hypocrite. Lots ...

Today's Vote on NSA Spying Is Vital, Whether It Succeeds or Not

July 24, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Do you know what your Congressional representative thinks about NSA spying? You're about to find out. The House of Representatives is expected to vote as soon as today on an amendment that would block the NSA's ability to collect records about every phone call made in the U.S. -- a ...

Analysis: The Case Against Universal National Service

June 27, 2013 The push for "national service," or compelling young people to spend a year or two doing deeds on behalf of America, is beginning anew. Entrepreneur Arianna Huffington filed a dispatch yesterday from Aspen, Colorado, where she'll be participating in an effort "to make universal national service a new American rite ...

What the NSA Does With the Data It Isn't Allowed to Keep

June 21, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In the latest scoop on NSA surveillance at The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald and James Ball post two different documents leaked to them by Edward Snowden. One concerns "minimization procedures." Kevin Drum explains what the phrase means: The NSA isn't allowed to spy on Americans, but the nature of modern communication ...

Why the FBI Shouldn't Be Trusted to Investigate the Death of Ibragim Todashev

June 20, 2013 Almost a month ago, the FBI shot and killed a 27-year-old man, Ibragim Todashev, during an interview at his Orlando, Florida apartment. In the aftermath of the shooting, various law enforcement officials gave wildlyconflicting accounts of what happened in the moments before his death: some said he was unarmed; others ...

Three Former NSA Employees Praise Edward Snowden, Corroborate Key Claims

June 18, 2013 USA Today has published an extraordinary interview with three former NSA employees who praise Edward Snowden's leaks, corroborate some of his claims, and warn about unlawful government acts. Thomas Drake, William Binney, and J. Kirk Wiebe each protested the NSA in their own rights. "For years, the three whistle-blowers had ...