AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Conor Friedersdorf

Conor Friedersdorf is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he focuses on politics and national affairs. He lives in Venice, California, and is the founding editor of The Best of Journalism, a newsletter devoted to exceptional nonfiction.
Results 21-30 of 109

Senator: The White House Should Launch a Criminal Probe of the CIA

August 1, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Senator Mark Udall, a member of the committee that conducts oversight of the Central Intelligence Agency, declared Thursday that the agency should be investigated by an independent counsel for violations of the Constitution, federal criminal statutes, and an executive order pertaining to surveillance. "From the unprecedented hacking of congressional staff ...

Does John Brennan Know Too Much for Obama to Fire Him?

August 1, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow When John Brennan assured the country that the CIA hadn't improperly monitored the Senate team that compiled a report on Bush-era torture, he fed us false information. That much is clear from Thursday's news that "the C.I.A. secretly monitored a congressional committee charged with supervising its activities." Either the CIA ...

Keith Alexander's Unethical Get-Rich-Quick Plan

August 1, 2014 Keith Alexander is trying to explain himself. The former director of the NSA stoked astonishment when reports surfaced that he would ask from $600,000 to as much as $1 million per month as a cybersecurity consultant. What could make him so valuable, save the highly classified secrets in his head? ...

Former NSA Director Could Be Cashing In Big Time

July 31, 2014 Keith Alexander is trying to explain himself. The former director of the NSA stoked astonishment when reports surfaced that he would ask from $600,000 to as much as $1 million per month as a cybersecurity consultant. What could make him so valuable, save the highly classified secrets in his head? ...

Keith Alexander Wants to Patent Method For Detecting Cyber Threats -- Is That Ethical?

July 31, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Keith Alexander is trying to explain himself. The former director of the NSA stoked astonishment when reports surfaced that he would ask from $600,000 to as much as $1 million per month as a cybersecurity consultant. What could make him so valuable, save the highly classified secrets in his head? ...

Libya May Not Be A Case Study in Intervention After All

July 29, 2014 In August 2011, Anne-Marie Slaughter, a prominent advocate of U.S. intervention in Libya, claimed vindication in the article, "Why Libya Skeptics Were Proved Badly Wrong." Americans benefited by helping Libyans fight for the sorts of democratic principles we so often champion, she argued, showing Middle Easterners that we're willing to ...

Want to Be the Next Intelligence Whistleblower? You May Want to Wait

July 28, 2014 Imagine a CIA agent who witnessed behavior that violated the Constitution, the law, and core human-rights protections, like torturing a prisoner. What would we have her do? Government officials say that there are internal channels in place to protect whistleblowers and that intelligence employees with security clearances have a moral ...

The Most Famous Whistleblowers on Why They Leaked

July 28, 2014 America's most famous whistleblowers, Daniel Ellsberg and Edward Snowden,talked via video at a New York hacker conference earlier this week. What follows is a condensed transcript highlighting a portion of their exchange on why they each decided to leak and why they identify with one another. The panel was moderated ...

Why Intelligence Whistleblowers Can't Use Internal Channels

July 28, 2014 Imagine a CIA agent who witnessed behavior that violated the Constitution, the law, and core human rights protections, like torturing a prisoner. What would we have her do? Government officials say that there are internal channels in place to protect whistleblowers, and that intelligence employees with security clearances have a ...

Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Kept His Oath Better Than Anyone in the NSA

July 25, 2014 Daniel Ellsberg, the celebrated leaker of the Pentagon Papers, said in a conversation last weekend with National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden that every human sometimes bites their tongue when they witness something that they know to be wrong—and blood often flows as a result. Due in part to lies ...