AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Charles S. Clark

Senior Correspondent Charles S. Clark joined Government Executive in the fall of 2009. He has been on staff at The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, National Journal, Time-Life Books, Tax Analysts, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the National Center on Education and the Economy. He has written or edited online news, daily news stories, long features, wire copy, magazines, books and organizational media strategies.
Results 3121-3130 of 3261

A Nomination That Never Was

August 11, 2011 Seekers of federal jobs may be forgiven for puzzling over a front-page item in the tabloid Federal Jobs Digest for the week of July 22-Aug. 4. Next to a dynamic photo of Elizabeth Warren, the founder of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau whom President Obama pointedly did not nominate...

Labor Department plans database to gauge discrimination by contractors

August 11, 2011 The Labor Department on Wednesday invited public comment on a proposal to create a new database of information on salaries, wages and benefits offered by federal contractors and subcontractors, with an eye toward curbing workplace discrimination. The proposed rule, still in the early planning stage, is aimed at improving the...

IRS Snail Mails at a Snail's Pace

August 10, 2011 The Internal Revenue Service too often fails to produce timely and instructive letters to individual taxpayers, according to a new report from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Not that every taxpayer is eager to open such missives, but efficient correspondence is a reasonable performance measure for such a...

TSA chief sketches out the future of airline passenger screening

August 10, 2011 A decade from now, the screening of airline passengers could be far less intrusive, Transportation Security Administrator John Pistole said on Wednesday. The so-called Checkpoint of the Future, which the International Air Transport Association conceives as three quickly accessed sensor-lined tunnels that segregate passengers into low, medium and high risk...

White House still reviewing plan for disclosing contractor campaign gifts

August 9, 2011 The White House has been largely silent since the April leak of a draft executive order that would require federal contractors to disclose their donations to political campaigns, a move actively opposed by Republican lawmakers and many in the contractor community. The issue was revived late last month when 62...

White House Pay (Cont'd)

August 8, 2011 When the White House released its annual data on staff salaries in July, a gossip site called Gawker published a widely reproduced chart with a resentful headline "White House Staffers Got a Raise Last Year, And You Did Not." Gawker stated that 54 percent of White House staffers received pay...

Privacy groups challenge proposal expanding access to terrorist watch list

August 8, 2011 The Homeland Security Department's plan to centralize and expand in-house access to the FBI's database of suspected terrorists has prompted a letter of protest from a coalition of Washington privacy organizations. In public comments submitted Aug. 5, a coalition led by the Electronic Privacy Information Center challenged a proposed rule...

Army sets stage to slash 8,700 civilian jobs

August 5, 2011 With the ink barely dry on debt-ceiling legislation, the Army has announced details of a plan to reduce its force by more than 8,700 civilian positions by the end of September 2012. The execution order for a move first announced in July has drawn strong opposition from the American Federation...

Above HHS's Pay Grade

August 4, 2011 A certain subject was declared off limits during a conference call with reporters held this morning by the two top officials at the Health and Human Services Department. HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Donald Berwick made opening statements reporting encouraging new data showing...

Former Office of Special Counsel chief can withdraw guilty plea

August 4, 2011 Scott Bloch, the head of the government's independent whistleblower protection agency under President George W. Bush who admitted to criminal contempt of Congress, on Wednesday won the right to withdraw an earlier guilty plea. Chief Judge Royce C. Lamberth for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled...