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Charles S. Clark

Senior Correspondent Charlie Clark joined Government Executive in the fall of 2009. He has been on staff at The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, National Journal, Time-Life Books, Tax Analysts, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the National Center on Education and the Economy. He has written or edited online news, daily news stories, long features, wire copy, magazines, books and organizational media strategies.
Results 1051-1060 of 1507

TSA on 'Recombobulation'

April 6, 2012 For decades it has been illegal for airline passengers to joke in front of security officials about threats such as hijackings. But that doesn’t mean humor is never called for, even among employees of the Transportation Security Administration. For several years now the Milwaukee County airport has livened up its ...

IRS commissioner won’t stay for second term

April 5, 2012 Internal Revenue Commissioner Doug Shulman said he plans to leave the agency when his five-year term ends in November. In a speech Thursday at the National Press Club, he also expressed hope that Congress would not wait until after the presidential election to address expiring tax provisions such as the ...

Diplomats demand pet parity

April 5, 2012 A grass-roots movement within the American Foreign Service Association is pressing United Airlines to give U.S. diplomatic families the same reduced prices for transporting family pets as the carrier extended last month to military families moving to permanent new assignments. Some 3,000 members of the 16,000-strong diplomats union have written ...

Obama signs STOCK Act requiring financial disclosure by federal employees

April 4, 2012 In one of Washington’s rare bipartisan bill-signing ceremonies, President Obama on Wednesday enacted the STOCK Act, a set of new financial disclosure requirements designed to prevent insider trading based on information gathered in the course of work by members of Congress and top executive branch officials. At a ceremony in ...

GSA Turns the Page

April 4, 2012 It took a couple of days, but the shell-shocked employees of the General Services Administration have finally updated the agency’s public website to reflect the departures on Monday of Administrator Martha Johnson and two top leaders. A photo and bio of acting administrator Dan Tangherlini sits now on the home ...

GSA turmoil will live on in congressional hearings

April 3, 2012 The revelations of spending excesses at a Las Vegas training conference will keep General Services Administration officials in the hot seat in the coming weeks as both chambers of Congress rev up for hearings on the agency’s inspector general report and broader performance issues. Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., chairman of ...

Lavish Las Vegas conference costs top GSA officials their jobs

April 2, 2012 This story has been updated. Top officials of the General Services Administration left the agency Monday as the GSA inspector general’s office readied a “scathing” report on wasteful spending at a Las Vegas training conference in 2010. As first reported by The Washington Post, Martha Johnson submitted her resignation, and ...

White House summit cranks up push to better inform the public

April 2, 2012 An all-day summit on a White House consumer awareness effort held on Friday in the National Archives and Records Administration auditorium is being called a success by the agency, academic and nonprofit sector representatives who attended the closed-to-the-press meeting. Cass Sunstein, the Obama administration’s chief of Information and Regulatory Affairs, ...

Suspension and debarment often misunderstood, contractors told

March 30, 2012 Though viewed by industry as a punishment, the government’s suspension and debarment procedure for errant contractors is designed to be an “instantaneous” way to protect taxpayers from irresponsible spending, a panel of procurement officials agreed on Thursday. They parted ways, however, on whether the current rules afford sufficient due process ...

Government curbs improper payments -- but not enough

March 29, 2012 The government is sending out fewer checks to undeserving recipients but better management -- possibly aided by new legislation -- still is necessary to truly tackle the problem of improper payments, a Senate panel was told. Improper government payments to shady contractors, deceased Medicaid clients, ineligible grantees and others had ...