AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems. She’s covered technology for more than a decade at such publications as National Journal's Technology Daily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, Sternstein covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She’s been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, MSNBC, WAMU and Federal News Radio. Sternstein is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
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Bomb plot planes not covered under cargo screening program

October 31, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The U.S.-bound cargo planes that were part of Friday's coordinated terrorist attack would not necessarily have been subject to the government's certified cargo screening program because the initiative's inspections only cover cargo on passenger flights, according to Homeland Security Department policies posted on the agency's website. Federal auditors recently criticized...

Postal Service called slow to exploit IT

October 29, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service has fallen behind in generating revenue from new applications of information technology, such as switching to a FedEx-like tracking system, selling USPS data to mailers and charging local governments to issue various citizen identification credentials at post offices, says the agency's independent regulator. One of...

Poll: Identity Theft Scarier than Internet Security

October 28, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Americans are more worried about terrorism, contagions and identity theft than Internet security, according to a twice-yearly security survey by Unisys. But it would seem that identity theft and Internet security are one and the same these days. So much so that the White House, over the weekend, announced the...

Cloud computing better protects data, Verizon says

October 27, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow As more federal workers rely on tablet computers and other mobile devices for tasks ranging from transmitting patient records on the battlefield to photographing safety violations at meatpacking plants, the number of data breaches might drop -- if users type in the cloud, Verizon officials said Wednesday. "As the tablets...

From Nextgov.com: Cloud computing better protects data, Verizon says

October 27, 2010 As more federal workers rely on tablet computers and other mobile devices for tasks ranging from transmitting patient records on the battlefield to photographing safety violations at meatpacking plants, the number of data breaches might drop -- if users type in the cloud, Verizon officials said Wednesday. Read the full...

OMB eases reporting requirements for financial chiefs

October 26, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Office of Management and Budget will no longer require chief financial officers to update a series of federal databases with information on progress toward many fiscal goals published on a website called FIDO.gov, according to an internal memo Nextgov obtained. On Oct. 15, Deputy Controller Debra Bond e-mailed the...

Bass Leaving OMB Watch

October 25, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow OMB Watch founder Gary Bass, who has advocated for greater government accountability for almost three decades, is leaving next year to head the foundation of the Bauman family, he announced on Monday. From his perch as executive director of OMB Watch, Bass has pushed for more public involvement in the...

Lots of Internet Freedom in Russia

October 25, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In Russia, a formerly repressive regime, citizens seem to have at least one new avenue of freedom that U.S. State Department officials have been trying to prop open globally: the blogosphere. Pro-government activists are not making much noise there, according to a new study by Harvard University's Berkman Center for...

Security flaws found in systems that track recovery-related spending at Transportation

October 25, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Transportation Department websites that post stimulus spending results could be vulnerable to hackers looking to attack visitors' computers and manipulate data, according to the department's inspector general. In December 2009, the IG's office began examining safeguards for the systems that track the $48 billion Congress authorized Transportation to spend on...

From Nextgov.com: Flaw found in systems that track recovery-related spending at Transportation

October 25, 2010 Transportation Department websites that post stimulus spending results could be vulnerable to hackers looking to attack visitors' computers and manipulate data, according to the department's inspector general. Read the full story on Nextgov.com