AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems. She’s covered technology for more than a decade at such publications as National Journal's Technology Daily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, Sternstein covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She’s been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, MSNBC, WAMU and Federal News Radio. Sternstein is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
Results 1461-1470 of 2625

Cracks in security leave DHS financial systems vulnerable to abuse

September 13, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Security weaknesses in the computers that track money for the Homeland Security Department could lead to a substantial mistake in the agency's financial statements, according to a federal audit. KPMG analysts hired by the DHS inspector general to assess the department's various financial systems for the fiscal year ending Sept....

DHS Notifies Web Users About Fake Sites

September 12, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Homeland Security Department now is warning Americans about fake websites that steal personal information, in the wake of a data breach at a site authentication service that reportedly ground Dutch e-government services to a halt last week. Google, Apple, Microsoft and DigiD, a website that allows the Dutch to...

DHS insider hacking case reveals serious network security vulnerabilities

September 12, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Recent interviews with current and former personnel involved in a 2008 federal investigation into hacking and other network abuse at an immigration application processing center in Texas portray an out-of-control information technology office at a key Homeland Security Department agency. The vulnerabilities exposed by the year-long probe raise troubling questions...

DHS insider hacking case reveals serious network security vulnerabilities

September 12, 2011 Recent interviews with current and former personnel involved in a 2008 federal investigation into hacking and other network abuse at an immigration application processing center in Texas portray an out-of-control information technology office at a key Homeland Security Department agency. The vulnerabilities exposed by the year-long probe raise troubling questions...

Terrorist watch lists should be put in the cloud, analysts say

September 9, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A decade after 19 al Qaeda members hijacked four passenger jets in the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil, security experts say cloud computing and other technological advances -- not legislative moves -- are needed to bridge the gaps remaining in the nation's terrorist watch lists. The various lists of...

Terrorist watch lists should be put in the cloud, analysts say

September 9, 2011 A decade after 19 al Qaeda members hijacked four passenger jets in the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil, security experts say cloud computing and other technological advances -- not legislative moves -- are needed to bridge the gaps remaining in the nation's terrorist watch lists. Read the whole story...

FBI withdraws request for 600 iPad tablet computers

September 8, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The FBI's operational technology division recently decided it wanted 600 Apple iPads to fulfill the unit's job of arming special agents with cutting-edge technology for foiling terrorists and criminals. Many gadgets the division develops and deploys exceed anything available on the shelves of Best Buy: Think night vision goggles and...

Effort to update computer fraud law draws warning from Justice

September 7, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Justice Department on Wednesday told lawmakers that inside attacks could go unpunished if they bow to the concerns of public interest groups and change anti-hacking laws to protect computer users who breach Web terms of service agreements. The 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which is expected to be...

Effort to update computer fraud law draws warning from Justice

September 7, 2011 The Justice Department on Wednesday told lawmakers that inside attacks could go unpunished if they bow to the concerns of public interest groups and change anti-hacking laws to protect computer users who breach Web terms of service agreements. Read the whole story at Nextgov.com.

Regional fusion centers share records on suspected terrorists

September 6, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A police officer driving by a King County, Wash., dam that supplies drinking water in the Seattle area notices a hole in a chain-link fence surrounding the premises. He interviews passersby to see whether they saw anybody with a wire cutter. His training tells him the hole could be the...