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Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems. She’s covered technology for more than a decade at such publications as National Journal's Technology Daily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, Sternstein covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She’s been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, MSNBC, WAMU and Federal News Radio. Sternstein is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
Results 1421-1430 of 2545

New Federal CIO Has Cyber Track Record

August 4, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Incoming federal chief information officer Steven VanRoekel says experience safeguarding the cloud at his former employer, the Federal Communications Commission, has prepared him to improve the security of digital assets governmentwide. In October, the then-FCC managing director announced that a new cloud-based environment hosting FCC.gov complied with a laundry list...

Biometric database helps end 'voluntary return' of illegal immigrants

August 4, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Government authorities are using a Homeland Security Department immigration database that tracks past arrests to end a policy under which illegal border crossers were allowed to return home without penalty, the top Customs and Border Protection official said on Thursday. In the past, undocumented aliens who were arrested but had...

Feds to kids: Hacking for government agencies can be cool

August 3, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Federal officials are planning to tell computer-savvy children about the risks and rewards of using their coding skills to break into computers at this weekend's first-ever DEF CON Kids hacker conference. The lineup for the Meet the Feds panel scheduled for Saturday includes, among others, leaders from the Army's computer...

Debt deal could be a blow for cybersecurity

August 2, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The $2.1 trillion debt-cap pact that Congress passed Tuesday could hurt economic and national security as agencies postpone plans to invest in cybersecurity technology and hire more network specialists due to uncertainty over potential program cuts, computer security advisers say. The legislation automatically chops about $1 trillion from federal activities...

Auditors: Pentagon Cyber Budget Has Fuzzy Numbers

August 1, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Federal auditors have told Pentagon officials to define "cybersecurity" so the military services adopt the same terminology, and by extension, calculate their cyber spending plans in comparable ways. With a clear definition, the department could avoid having to redo the math on its cyber budget, something it was forced to...

Case Study: Cybersecurity best practices at Defense

August 1, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The U.S. military's computer systems are probed by outsiders millions of times a day, while insiders, like a soldier who allegedly extracted heaps of classified files for public consumption on the WikiLeaks website, also pose threats. In mid-July, the Pentagon released an unprecedented cybersecurity strategy that formally branded cyberspace as...

Report: Inadequate Coast Guard data sharing obstructed communication after oil spill

August 1, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The failure of a beleaguered $30 billion U.S. Coast Guard modernization program to resolve communication problems hampered the exchange of data between aircraft and vessels during last year's Deepwater Horizon oil disaster, federal auditors say. The program, also named Deepwater, was started in 1996 to refresh nearly all the service's...

Cybersecurity: Defense Department

August 1, 2011 The U.S. military's computer systems are probed by outsiders millions of times a day, while insiders, like a soldier who allegedly extracted heaps of classified files for public consumption on the WikiLeaks website, also pose threats. In mid-July, the Pentagon released an unprecedented cybersecurity strategy that formally branded cyberspace as...

Shared interest in online fraud makes strange bedfellows

July 28, 2011 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The U.S. government is turning to some unexpected partners to fend off Chinese cyber spies and Russian hackers -- China and Russia. While both countries have been accused of condoning, if not outright sponsoring, malicious online activity, they each share America's frustration with identity theft. U.S. officials see that commonality...

From Nextgov: Shared interest in online fraud makes strange bedfellows

July 28, 2011 The U.S. government is turning to some unexpected partners to fend off Chinese cyber spies and Russian hackers -- China and Russia. Read the full story on Nextgov.